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Welcome To FindAProfessionalDoctorate.com

A Database of Professional Doctorate Programmes Worldwide

This site lists doctoral qualifications aimed at those working in nursing, engineering, psychology, law, social work, education and a growing number of other professions.

Latest Professional Doctorates
44114| University of the Highlands and Islands| Pedagogy - Learning and Teaching Academy| [[Learning and Teaching Academy ]]
The Learning and Teaching Academy provides a range of opportunities for staff to engage in, or to further their engagement in, pedagogic scholarship and research. We are focused in particular on supporting:

Research-informed practice Being aware of new developments in pedagogic practice and research, and using them to inform our own learning, teaching and assessment approaches.

Evidence-led practice Applying the outputs of pedagogic evaluation and research, including that undertaken in our own contexts, to enhancing the experience of our learners.

Engagement in scholarship Undertaking scholarly activities that contribute to the sharing and development of pedagogic practice within our disciplines and within the University.

Engagement in research Active participation in pedagogic research that is intended to produce peer-reviewed outputs, support postgraduate research, or contribute in other ways to public bodies of knowledge about pedagogy as a field of practice and research.

The support and activities the Academy offers or helps to co-ordinate in the above areas include:

One-to-one advice for colleagues who are interesting in getting involved in pedagogic research, including guidance on designing and undertaking their initial projects.

Workshop and seminars on pedagogic practice and research.

Input to relevant events and workshops being offered within Subject Networks, Academic Partners, Faculties, and other groups within the university including research clusters.

Support to produce peer-reviewed publications for education-related journals, through direct guidance and short courses. The Academy will also build upon recent work in organising special issues of relevant journals, for example the Special Issue of JPAAP on Learning and Teaching in the Distributed University which featured several papers from colleagues.

Access to the learning lab to support colleagues in undertaking their pedagogic research.

Providing funding opportunities (e.g. LTA Scholarships) to support small-scale projects.

Supporting colleagues in authoring or co-authoring external research funding applications.


[[How to apply]]
There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44113| University of the Highlands and Islands| Social Sciences| Researchers at the University of the Highlands and Islands are conducting studies into the social, legal and economic aspects of rural communities, both in the Highlands and Islands and elsewhere in the world.

[[Rural Childhood]]
The Centre for Rural Childhood researches the issues of children worldwide who grow up in a rural environment. It looks at the many aspects of childhood, including health, education, drugs, crime and abuse, all within a rural context. For example projects 'Child Trafficking - Scoping Study' and 'UK Refugee Determination Process – claims from minors'.

[[Tourism and heritage]]
Centre for Culture, Heritage and Tourism, based at Perth College UHI, carries out studies and supports organisations to assess and improve the economic impact of tourism and visitor experiences.

[[ESOL Programme]]
Following the Scottish Executive strategy paper on future adult ESOL provision and subsequent increase in provision, the NHC lead ESOL Programme will obtain in-depth feedback on the experiences of a group of previous and current students to give a clearer picture on the added (metalinguistic) benefit for students of greater integration within their communities. The research will explore areas of discernible impacts on the lives of migrant workers.

[[Recreation and Tourism]]
The Centre for Recreation and Tourism Research, based at West Highland College UHI, has strong outdoor industry links and works closely with practitioners, landowners and NGO’s to develop and enhance Scottish tourism through a range of knowledge exchange mechanisms.

[[Remote and Rural studies]]
Researchers at the UHI Centre for Remote and Rural Studies are addressing the social, economic, environmental and cultural challenges facing remote and rural regions across the globe.

[[Higher Education models]]
University Collaboration in Regional Development Spaces (UNICREDS) is a project, funded by the INTERREG IVCprogramme, investigating how different models of higher education can benefit regional economic development.


[[How to apply]]
There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44112| University of the Highlands and Islands| Nordic Studies| [[Centre for Nordic Studies]]
The Centre for Nordic Studies is Scotland’s most northerly research centre. We deliver locative based research and teaching in the Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland. We aim to place the Scottish Islands and Scottish Highlands in their Nordic and North Atlantic context. We work with other universities in the UK and abroad, heritage agencies and local businesses.

The UHI Centre for Nordic Studies is engaged in interdisciplinary research in, of and for the Highlands and Islands, with an international team of lecturers and researchers that are committed to research of international reach and significance.

As well as scholarly activity, such as gathering new research and writing for leading academic publications, the team also shares their research with a wider public audience through engagement with local and regional community groups and cultural organisations.CNS has been involved in the following funded research projects:

2010 - 2013 the HERA Joint Research Programme funded Assembly Project (TAP) – Meeting-places in Northern Europe AD 400-1500, an international collaborative project investigating the first systems of governance in Northern Europe, co-investigator with the Universities of Oslo, Vienna, and Durham.
2012 - 2013 the AHRC funded Skills Training programme for PhD students and ECRs in the field of Old Norse-Icelandic and Viking Studies, co-investigator with the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, and Nottingham.
2012 the AHRC funded Orkney and Shetland Dialect Corpus Project - a scoping study to ascertain the feasibility of developing a larger corpus-based project on Orkney and Shetland dialect grammar.
2011 - 2013 the Royal Society of Edinburgh funded Hjaltland Research Network - created to plan a large-scale multi-disciplinary research project into Viking Age Shetland and the North Atlantic, co-investigator with the Universities of Lund, Copenhagen and Edinburgh.
2002 - 2006 the Northern Peripheries Project Northern Heritage consortium, co-investigator with Universities in Scandinavia.

We offer research-led teaching at post-graduate level in the form of five MLitt programmes.

We advise PhD students working on topics such as and intercultural exchange between Shetland and Norway, the Vikings, traditional Shetland boats, Orcadian Identity and Highlands and Islands literature.


[[How to apply]]
There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44111| University of the Highlands and Islands| Marine Science| [[Marine Science UHI (SAMS UHI)]]
Marine environment research is the focus for the Scottish Association for Marine Science UHI (SAMS UHI), based in Oban, where 90% of research was judged to be 'internationally recognised' in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). SAMS UHI scientists are working on a range of projects within four departments: ecology; biogeochemistry and earth science; microbial and molecular; physics, sea ice and technology.

[[The Rivers and Lochs Institute]]based at Inverness College UHI, the institute works to develop integrated, multidisciplinary research projects to more rapidly advance understanding of Scottish freshwater ecosystem and to research the nature and extent of freshwater biodiversity in lochs and rivers in Scotland. Working with local rivers trusts, fisheries boards, landowners, industry and the public sector.

[[The Environmental Research Institute (ERI)]]based at North Highland College UHI in Thurso, marine environmental issues and sustainable use of the earth's natural resources. ERI's research includes: renewable energy - it's impacts on the marine environment; Tidal resource & wave climate assessment; ecology; emerging contaminants; tidal stream monitoring and modelling; Currents, sedimentation and associated ecological change.

[[NAFC Marine Centre UHI]]is conducting research in fisheries science to contribute to the assessment, management and sustainable harvesting of important marine species, commercially important finfish and shellfish species. Marine Planning, Policy and Advice Section is relevant to how resources are utilised within regulatory frameworks and environmental impacts. The centre is the site and lead partner in the collaborative mussel hatchery project "Stepping Stone".


[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44110| University of the Highlands and Islands| History| [[The UHI Centre for History]]
The UHI Centre for History pursues historical research in, of and for the Highlands and Islands.

As the newest university History department in the UK, the Centre comprises an ambitious and vibrant team of historians, committed to research of international reach and significance. All of the Centre’s lecturers are research-active, visiting archives, writing books and articles that are published by leading academic presses and presenting their research to a wider public audience through engagement with local and regional community groups and cultural organisations.

Our research focuses on the history of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland and the wider world, from the medieval period to the twentieth century. While focusing on the history of the region, lecturers at the Centre have research specialisms in the following areas:

Irish, Scottish and British Diasporas
Maritime and Coastal History in the North Sea and the Baltic
Religiosity and Ecclesiastical History
Women, Gender and the Family
Warfare and Ethnic Conflict
Sport History

The Centre’s research has attracted substantial funds from external sources, including the Wellcome Trust, Scottish and Southern Energy, the Forestry Commission, Carnegie Trust UK, the British Academy and the Leverhulme Trust.

The Centre has a growing body of taught postgraduate students, as well as postgraduate students undertaking research degrees.

Our vibrant research culture is supported by a number of events, including our seminar series, at which historians from Scotland, the UK and the world are invited to speak.

Centre staff are also responsible, along with colleagues at the University of Aberdeen, for co-editing the peer-reviewed journal Northern Scotland, which is published annually by Edinburgh University Press

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44109| University of the Highlands and Islands| Health| [[Centre for Health Science]]
One of the main aims of the Centre for Health Science was to build upon the health science research activity in the region which is encouraged through collaboration, knowledge transfer, improved clinical outcomes, publications and commercialisation.

Since the first phase of the Centre was opened in 2006 over 70 research projects have taken place attracting over £6m of funding, working with a wide range of partners including University of Edinburgh, University of Aberdeen, Glasgow School of Art, NHS Highland and NHS Education for Scotland.

There are always opportunities for collaborative research projects in the Centre for Health Science, in particular in the areas of:

diabetes
genetics
telehealthcare and digital medicine
rural health
lipidomics
clinical trials

If you are looking to run a clinical trial the Highland Clinical Research Facility is ideal. Or if you are looking for a lab to run contract research UHI's Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Science can help.

[[The Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Science]]

The Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Science based at the Centre for Health Science in Inverness, is conducting extensive research, primarily into the causes and consequences of diabetes, but also into a wide range of clinical conditions; most notably cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Led by Professor Ian Megson, the mission of the department is to undertake world class research into the causes and treatment of diabetes and the cardiovascular diseases that the condition precipitates. The department also undertakes a range ofcontract research to support commercial entities of any size.

The department is also home to the Free Radical Research Facility, and has research expertise in genetics and immunology, and lipidomics.

[[Rural Health and Wellbeing, Digital Health]]

The Rural Health and Wellbeing group (RHW) aims to advance knowledge of health and health services in rural and remote communities. Those communities currently face a number of important challenges including:

changes in demography;
changes in the nature of health care provision;
and increased expectations of the community.
RHW is developing the evidence base for rural health care by:

carrying out relevant primary research;
developing collaborative research with social scientists, geographers and policy researchers;
bringing the international perspective through appropriate collaborations.
The research group carries out innovative research and evaluation in the area of rural health, health services and community wellbeing. Based within the UHI Division of Health Research, the group collaborates with other UHI researchers in, Inverness, Moray and Lews Castle Colleges as well as being a member of the Digital Health Institute and RGU-UHI collaboration.
Using applied social science, the unit’s work in digital health focuses on how technology can be used in new ways to deliver health services in rural areas. This involves the design, testing and evaluation of technology to advance understanding of the digital infrastructure, organisational, professional and cultural barriers to the use of technology in rural services.

[[Lipidomics Research Facility]]

The Lipidomics Research Facility is a major new research unit looking at the impact of lipids, commonly known as fats, on disease development. It is the first unit in Scotland to turn the spotlight specifically on looking at the role of lipids in disease.

Developed by the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI), the unit has been funded by Highlands and Islands Enterprise, the European Regional Development Fund and the Scottish Further and Higher Education Funding Council.

The focus of the research is to apply cutting-edge techniques to explore the role of lipids in the progression of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Led by Professor Phil Whitfield, the team are actively researching with partners in the region and elsewhere in the UK, as well as Europe and USA.


[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44108| University of the Highlands and Islands| Environmental| [[Mountain studies]]

At our Centre for Mountain Studies, based at Perth College UHI, an international group of scientists is undertaking research in Scotland, Europe, and at the global level. A major focus is on policies for sustainable mountain development, and providing the evidence base for these. The centre hosts the UNESCO Chair in Sustainable Mountain Development and its world-class research underpins the MSc Managing Sustainable Mountain Development.

[[Environmental research]]

The Environmental Research Institute (ERI), based at North Highland College UHI in Thurso, is involved in research to address environmental issues and advance understanding of the sustainable use of the earth's natural resources. ERI's research priorities include: renewable energy; climate change; ecology; biogeochemistry; emerging contaminants; biotechnology; and bio resources.

[[Remote and Rural studies]]

Researchers at the UHI Centre for Remote and Rural Studies investigate the social, economic, environmental and cultural opportunities and challenges facing remote and rural places and people. We do this through conducting high quality research, stimulating public debate and the analysis and evaluation of policy options that secure the long term wellbeing of remote and rural regions.

[[Recreation and Tourism]]

The Centre for Recreation and Tourism Research, based at West Highland College UHI, has strong outdoor industry links and works closely with practitioners, landowners and NGO’s to develop and enhance Scottish tourism through a range of knowledge exchange mechanisms.

[[Sustainability]]

Sustainability Network Projects, based at Lews Castle College UHI, the SEARCH and NERD projects are sustainability projects investigating social, economic, and environmental aspects to improve sustainable lifestyles in the rural areas. As a linking theme that unites geography with aspects of health, energy, economy, and culture, the research is directed at investigating practical examples of sustainability.

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44107| University of the Highlands and Islands| Energy; Energy Engineering; Energy Technology; Energy and the Environment| Energy is a key research theme for the University of the Highlands and Islands, and we are building a reputation for excellence in research across a range of energy topics critical to the future economic development of the Highlands and Islands region and also to the long-term sustainability of the economy of the whole of Scotland.

The university is uniquely placed to make an important contribution to global research into new energy sources. Located in an environment that boasts internationally important landscapes and seascapes, and can be considered the primary European geography for renewable energy developments. The university has world-class facilities and multi-disciplinary research teams who are focusing on, and providing solutions to, the big energy challenges of our time. Our research teams have a special depth of understanding of the key issues surrounding the interface between energy generation and natural environments; be they marine, coastal or terrestrial.

This programme provides an opportunity for prospective students to obtain a Research or PhD qualification either on a full-time or part-time basis in the areas of energy engineering; energy technology and energy and the environment.

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44106| University of the Highlands and Islands| Culture and Heritage| [[Gaelic language and culture]]

The UK's only Gaelic medium teaching and research institution at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI on the Isle of Skye. It has a reputation for international excellence in research into Celtic studies and house an impressive collection of Gaelic, Celtic and Highland resources and archives.

Soillse - a research capacity building project to support and revitalise the Gaelic language and culture. This initiative is led by Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI in partnership with Lews Castle College UHI and the Universities of Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh and is funded by Scottish Funding Council SRDG scheme.

[[Remote and Rural studies]]

Researchers at the Centre for Remote and Rural Studiesare addressing the social, economic, environmental and cultural challenges facing remote and rural regions across the globe.

[[Theology]]

At the Highland Theological College UHI Biblical studies, church history and pastoral theology are particular areas of study. The Reformed, evangelical ethos of the college is often reflected in the conference papers, articles and books published by HTC staff. The library at HTC contains approximately 65,000 volumes including significant special collections.

[[The Centre for Culture, Heritage and Tourism]] based at Perth College UHI, carries out studies and supports organisations to assess and improve the economic impact of tourism and visitor experiences.

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44105| University of the Highlands and Islands| Creative Industries| Artist researchers contribute to a vibrant culture of research led teaching in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum at Moray School of Art, Scotland’s fifth major art school. Research active staff operate across a broad spectrum of fine art and textiles practice with research interest in a range of areas including:

painting at the digital interface;
poesis and spatial practice;
the legacies of surrealism;
medical visualisation and drawing;
gender, natality and printmaking;
photographic practice, writing and spectrality.

[[Moray School of Art]] also leads the Between Places visual arts research group, initiated by visual practitioners and academics across the university in the Cultural and Creative Industries. The group aims to undertake innovative enquiry into practices and ideas relating to place, landscape and language, alongside contemporary approaches to the art in and of the Highlands and Islands. The dispersed nature of the research group resonates with our interest in place as an embodiment of possibility: place as a juncture or nexus of people, culture, environment engendered by geographies of inward and outward migration.

The dynamic nature of the world requires that we think about landscape and place in terms of the temporal, recognising that place is fluid and mobile, a landscape continually inscribed with the vestige and trace of cultural activity. The dynamism of place in practice can also be considered in terms of dialogue, informed by the view that the dialogic, in the strongest sense, captures the idea that we are made in dialogue with others, and indeed in dialogue with different places.

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44104| University of the Highlands and Islands| Archaeology| [[The University of the Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute]] is a world-class teaching and research organisation dedicated to advancing our understanding of the historic environment through the creation, interpretation and dissemination of archaeological knowledge.The Institute provides a focus for :

university teaching and lifelong learning
innovative research
commercial applied research and consultancy
Our research

Situated in beautiful but environmentally fragile landscapes, our work takes in the full range of the Highlands and Islands’ rich and diverse archaeological heritage, including :

Neolithic stone-built settlements, tombs and stone circles.
Iron Age brochs
Pictish and Viking settlements and burials
historical archaeology of the Clearances
the First and Second World Wars.
The Archaeology Institute is also building a reputation for excellence by undertaking internationally significant research further afield with current research projects ongoing in Easter Island, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

You can also study for either MPhil (Master of Philosophy) or PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) in archaeology, enabling you to develop your own interests and ideas alongside a growing group of postgraduate research students undertaking research into a wide variety of topics. If you are interested in undertaking a research degree in archaeology, then please contact the department either via email or phone, to discuss your ideas before making a formal application.

For more information on any of our courses please feel free to contact Dr.Ingrid Mainland or telephone +44 (0)1856 569323 for an informal chat.

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44103| University of the Highlands and Islands| Aquaculture| [[Rivers and Lochs]]

The Rivers and Lochs Institute, based at Inverness College UHI, the institute works to develop integrated, multidisciplinary research projects to more rapidly advance understanding of Scottish freshwater ecosystem and to research the nature and extent of freshwater biodiversity in lochs and rivers in Scotland. We work with local rivers trusts, fisheries boards, landowners, industry and the public sector to provide scientific support to managers to protect and conserve biodiversity conservation and ensure its exploitation is sustainable.

For example:

Genetic analysis of brown trout in Loch Laidon reveals the presence of three genetically distinct breeding populations
Rivers and Lochs Institute involved in NASCO-EU funded SALSEA-MERGE project
Shellfish Hatchery – Stepping Stone Project could lead to Scotland’s first commercial mussel hatchery.
Funding has recently been approved for a trial to test the commercial viability of a mussel hatchery in Scotland. The main funders are currently Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE) and The Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre (SAIC). The 30-month project could lead to higher productivity in the shellfish industry and support rural businesses and jobs.

Other key partners in the hatchery project include the Scottish Shellfish Marketing Group (SSMG), the University of the Highlands and Islands and the Scottish Government.

Shellfish production is a growing industry in Scotland, supporting over 500 jobs across the supply chain, many in rural areas. Mussel production in Scotland reached its highest-ever level in 2014, with Shetland accounting for almost 80% of production.

There is capacity and demand to raise production substantially, if the industry can address issues such as the availability of mussel spat (juvenile mussels). The establishment of a commercial hatchery to produce spat will help to resolve this issue, providing Scottish producers with a reliable supply of spat (and potentially other juvenile shellfish species).

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.

44102| University of the Highlands and Islands| Agriculture: Agronomy Cereals, Biomass crops and Natural products research| [[Research On Cereals]]

Our cereals research programme is aimed at developing new commercial opportunities for cereals in the Highlands and Islands and includes research on both old and modern cereal varieties. Apart from creating new markets for growers and food and drink companies, the programme also aims to increase self-sufficiency in rural areas, reduce the carbon footprint of the region's food and drink industry and conserve valuable crop genetic resources.

[[Research and Development Activities With Biomass Crops]]

We have an important research programme investigating the potential of biomass crops as sources of wood fuel for windy, northern areas like Orkney.

[[Natural products research]]

Many Scottish plants have a long tradition of use as sources of medicines, flavourings, fragrances, dyes, cosmetic products and for other specialist purposes. Our region has a unique but varied range of growing conditions which have important effects on the vegetation and crops which grow in the region and on the chemical composition and quality of plant products. Moreover, the unspoilt Scottish environment has an excellent marketing image, making the area potentially very attractive for the production of plant-based natural products.

[[Department specialisms]]
Commerciable plant based 'new products';
'Alternative' crops;
Dye crops;
Food industry R&D needs;
Biomass crops;
Portable extraction technology;
Cereals crops;
Natural products;
developing supply chains;

[[How to apply]]

There is no national system for applying for postgraduate research study in the way that UCAS operates at undergraduate level.

Step 1: Make contact with relevant academic staff to consider your application in detail; to ensure you meet the entrance requirements; to develop a suitable research proposal, title and plan; assign a Director of Studies; establish an appropriate supervisory team; and discuss funding.

Here's a handy guide to writing a good research proposal.

Step 2: Complete an application form with your proposed Director of Studies.

Step 3: Your application will be submitted by the proposed Director of Studies to the university's Research Degrees Committee for approval.

Step 4: Approved applications are sent to the University of Aberdeen, our accrediting university for research degrees for final approval and registration.

Further information on all aspects of applying to study for a postgraduate research degree is available from the Graduate School. Please contact us if you cannot find the information you are looking for or would like to be put in contact with an academic within your area of study.
44060| London Metropolitan University| Forensic Psychology Professional Doctorate| Upon completion of two years full-time supervised practice (or equivalent), attendance at workshops and completion of the thesis portfolio, the Professional Doctorate will equip you with the appropriate experience and qualifications to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a registered psychologist with the right to use the title forensic psychologist.

[[About the course]]
In addition to enabling you to apply for HCPC registration, this course is designed to satisfy the British Psychological Society’s (BPS) Stage 2 requirements for chartered psychologist status.

The course aims to produce competent, informed, reflective, and ethically and professionally sound practitioners of forensic psychology who are able to work in different settings. There will be a synthesis between taught workshops and your practical placements. Trainees are required to demonstrate core forensic psychology competencies at an advanced level and to complete D-level research. In addition to general forensic competencies and research, key areas of the course include consultancy, teaching and training, and assessments and interventions.

The course is delivered by a combination of professional workshops, supervised practice, research, and individual, group, and peer supervision. Course leaders are registered forensic psychologists with experience working in prisons, secure hospitals, and independent forensic practise in the UK and the US. Because working in multidisciplinary environments is increasingly important, some lectures are taught by registered psychologists in other fields, including health, occupational, and counselling psychology.

Throughout the course, critical reflection is encouraged on current discourses within contemporary forensic issues. We expect you to adopt a questioning stance to forensic practice that constantly looks to the multplicity of clients’ needs and expectations.

[[Assessment]]
The course is assessed through a thesis portfolio (46,000 words in total) and a Viva Voce that assesses the thesis portfolio. Components that make up the portfolio include the following:

D Level Research Dissertation
Assessment Case Study
Treatment Case Study
Consultancy Case Study
Communication Portfolio
Teaching Portfolio (including DVD of teaching)
Training Portfolio
Professional Skills Competency Portfolio
Competency Log Book as appendix

[[Professional accreditation]]
The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), meaning that students who successfully complete the course are eligible to apply for registration as a forensic psychologist.

The course has also been designed to satisfy the academic requirements for the core competencies specified by the British Psychological Society (BPS) Stage 2 training in forensic psychology, leading to approval as a chartered psychologist.

[[Modular structure]]
All teaching takes place in small groups, including presentations, visiting experts, seminars and workshops. Training begins with a two-week Induction period, during which time seminars will be given both morning and afternoon Wednesday through Friday. Subsequently, workshops take place every three to four weeks on a Friday.

Individual supervision sessions are arranged at the convenience of trainees and supervisors. As a trainee, you can expect supervision every 3-4 weeks during your first year and every 1-2 months during your second year. You will meet with your supervisory team at least four times a year. Supervisors will also provide telephone and email supervision throughout the year. We also expect trainees to take part in peer supervision through group meetings and through the use of Weblearn discussion forums.

The course does not have a module structure. However, several essential themes are addressed by lectures, supervision, and teaching and learning exercises throughout the course. These include, for example:

working with clients, eg developing a working alliance, giving feedback/cultural diversity, Intervention approaches, risk assessment approaches, trauma-informed intervention
working with other professionals, eg leadership and group process, multidisciplinary working and case conferences, providing supervision and directing the work of others
ethical and reflective practice, eg ethical decision making, reflective thinking and writing, evaluating practice including quality control; and
research skills, eg systematic review, writing for publication.

[[After the course]]
You can expect to go into careers within the prisons service, health service, charity sector, or academic sector in a professional capacity as a chartered psychologist and registered forensic psychologist.

[[Why London Met?]]
At London Metropolitan University, we place students at the centre of everything we do. We are proud of our vibrant, multicultural and socially diverse community, and welcome applicants regardless of age or background. We offer most of our courses on both a full- and part-time basis, in order to best meet your needs.

The University also has a strong culture of research. Over two thirds of the research we submitted to the most recent Research Assessment Exercise was judged to be “internationally recognised”, “internationally excellent” or “world-leading”. Many of these expert researchers will be leading your lectures, as will employers and professionals with extensive real-world experience. They will be supported by an excellent network of guest speakers and mentors from the industry, making sure you get the best possible guidance.

[[Support from London Met]]
If this course is for you, please make sure you also take a look at key resources for postgraduate students on our website:

Postgraduate open days: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/events/postgraduate-open-days/
Applying for a postgraduate course: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/applying/postgraduate/
Funding support for postgraduate students: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/applying/funding-your-studies/
43443| Newman University| Doctorate of Education (EdD)| The [[Doctor of Education]] (EdD) has been specifically designed for professionals working in a variety of education-related, public service and charity sectors and who are ready to make the next step to doctoral study in part-time mode. Those joining the programme will typically come from occupational backgrounds such as teaching, learning support, advisory roles, police work, social work and health-related professions. The shared interest for this student community will be a desire to pursue an area of doctoral research related to and drawing on their professional work with the aim of creating new knowledge, applications and understanding that will bring both personal benefits and a contribution of originality and innovation in the wider professional and academic community.

Validated by Liverpool Hope University, the programme has a strong emphasis on individualised learning and personal critical reflection related to professional identities, values and contexts. The programme provides a structured environment in which students engage at an advanced level with a range of academic and professional issues relevant to their own practice. The learning and teaching strategy seeks to develop key skills of independent learning, independent research, and sustained critical self-reflexive analysis through a blend of academic and professional themes.

The programme has a minimum registration period of four years and is taught over a series of five study week-ends divided into two parts. In the first of these, students undertake three ‘strands’ of taught study (equalling 40 credits each) involving [[Professional Identity and Values; Knowledge]], [[Truth and Values in Research]]; [[Research Skills and Methods]]. This is followed by the writing of a substantial research proposal (60 credits), which forms the foundation for the supervised thesis in part 2 on a research question related to individual professional practice.

The professional doctorate is undertaken on a part time basis. Part One (Years 1 and 2) consists of three ‘strands’ of taught study (equalling 40 credits each), followed by the writing of a substantial research proposal (60 credits) on a research question broadly related to professional practice. On successful completion of Part One, students progress to Part Two (Years 3 and 4) which comprises a substantial independent research project (60,000 words).
43277| Queen’s University Belfast| Professional Doctorate in Education| [[School of Education]]
The School of Education is a thriving and dynamic research unit with a strong research culture and ambitious research strategy. We are committed to ensuring that it undertakes the highest quality research that contributes fully to the development of education policy and practice locally and globally. Pioneering research is the lifeblood of the School and is evidenced by the most recent REF Results (2014), in which we were ranked 4th within the UK in relation to research intensity with 87% of the research undertaken within the School assessed as ‘internationally excellent or world leading’.

[[Professional Doctorate in Education]]
The EdD is a flexible partly taught and partly research-based doctorate which is designed for senior professionals in education and related fields. The EdD may be taken on a part-time (normally 4-6 years) or full-time (normally 3 years) basis.

There are three stages to each EdD taught module which covers a four month period. The first stage is pre-reading. The second stage is attendance for the intensive teaching, normally over a consecutive period of two and a half days. The third stage involves the completion and submission of an assignment, normally within three months of the last date of the taught module.

We offer taught modules in research methods, education policy, education management and professional development. Dissertations are supported within our specialist research centres including effective education, shared education, children’s rights, and behaviour analysis.

Within the School of Education we offer two professional doctorates, the EdD and the EdD TESOL.

Undertaking an EdD is a highly rewarding experience and at the School of Education you will have the opportunity to work with some of the most passionate researchers in their field. Our Doctoral Research Centre has over 175 full time and part time research students from 25 countries worldwide, and therefore enjoys the many benefits that this brings to its research community.

[[Centre for Shared Education EdD Scholarships (2016 entry)]]
The Centre for Shared Education at Queen’s University Belfast is offering bursaries of £2000 each to five students taking up a part-time or full-time place on the EdD course in the academic year 2016/17. Please visit our Scholarships page for eligibility, assessment criteria and application procedure. Applications must be received by 4pm on 1 August 2016.

[[Further information]]
Dr Aisling O’Boyle
Course Director – Professional Doctorate in Education
a.oboyle@qub.ac.uk

Telephone: +44 2890975941

Website: www.qub.ac.uk/edu
43027| University of Stirling| Doctor in TESOL Research| [[Introduction]]

New for 2016, the PhD in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) Research is a unique programme, offered at the University of Stirling. This ground-breaking programme will develop your research skills to a professional level, which is characteristic of a PhD degree, and support your learning through seven modules, a feature of taught doctorates. During your time at Stirling, your learning will be facilitated by tutors who have extensive expertise in TESOL, research methods and/or educational theories. This is a novel PhD programme across the UK, which is entirely dedicated to TESOL Research. If you are interested in investigating language use, teaching and/or learning, this PhD programme will be of interest to you. The PhD will challenge the boundaries of your academic knowledge and will be a rewarding experience both personally and professionally.

[[Is a PhD in TESOL Research for me?]]

This program will appeal to you should you wish to develop your research skills and to become an autonomous researcher. Our PhD in TESOL Research will provide you with an opportunity to go beyond what would be required from a Master’s of Research (MRes) and an Educational Doctorate (EdD) in that you will produce a more substantial 60,000-word thesis. Before embarking on your thesis investigation, the program will foster your research skill development through seven taught modules on TESOL, research methods and educational theories. This academic support is one of the key differences between the University of Stirling’s PhD in TESOL Research and other comparable PhD programs currently on offer in the UK. By attaining a PhD you will achieve something significant. This qualification will mark you out as an expert researcher in the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages. You will achieve new skills in understanding complex matters, sharpen your problem solving abilities, increase your confidence as a researcher and expand your knowledge of the field while also enjoying the PhD experience, which is an often overlooked aspect of the process. The academic environment at Stirling will not only give you freedom and challenges, but it will also provide you with numerous chances for intellectual debate with fellow experts. Your PhD journey will shape your future like no other qualification – academically, professionally and personally.

http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/programme-information/prospectus/social-sciences/tesol-research-phd/

[[Course objectives]]

This unique PhD programme provides you with an ideal opportunity to develop your knowledge and research skills in TESOL in a multicultural environment. It will be of interest to those who have a background in Languages, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, or a related field as well as to language teaching practitioners who have a keen interest in research.

As a student on the programme, you will have the chance to investigate a topic of your choice in a systematic and thorough way. You will have access to numerous options for further development offered by the Stirling Graduate School and by the School of Social Sciences. TESOL students are also invited to our reading group meetings as well as to our English Language Teaching and Research (ELTR) events, which are delivered by leading researchers/professionals.

On completion, you will be a well-rounded professional researcher who has knowledge of the wider educational field, is proficient in the use of both quantitative and qualitative methods, has the skills needed to research any area within TESOL, and is able to make a contribution to scholarly knowledge and professional practice.

[[Delivery and assessment]]

The taught modules in this ground-breaking PhD in TESOL Research programme are delivered on a face-to-face and blended basis. The delivery types (e.g. lectures, workshops and student presentations) are carefully selected to suit the module content and your needs. The modules in your first year of full-time study (or first three years of part-time study) are delivered in a concentrated way mostly on Fridays, providing you with the time you need for reading and conducting your research.

Summative assessment for the taught modules will vary depending on their respective learning outcomes (e.g. presentation, annotated bibliography, essay, research proposal). For each 20-credit module, you will be asked to produce a piece of work which is equivalent to a 3,000-word essay. Your final assignment will be the production of original research to be reported in a 60,000-word thesis.

[[Employability]]

The University of Stirling is committed to enhancing your employability. Once you register for the PhD in TESOL Research, you will have access to the first-class range of services offered by the Career Development Centre, which you can avail of even after your graduation. Within TESOL, we additionally provide you with a tailored workshop series entitled “My career in TESOL” aimed at developing your awareness of continuous professional development, your knowledge of job market requirements and your confidence in applying for jobs. Your time as a PhD student at Stirling will not only help you to develop your research skills, but it will also provide you with a thorough understanding of how to evidence these skills when seeking a new post or applying for a promotion.
42575| Leeds Beckett University| Education (Professional Doctorate)| The Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD) is a research degree with equivalent outcomes to a PhD including its level of award and title. The EdD provides continuing professional development for those working across the field of education in its broadest sense.

You will enhance your understanding of research and its application, engaging in critical discussions and reflections that involve in-depth consideration of the relationships between theory and practice. The first year consists of three taught units. The thesis component involves one substantive research study of 60,000 words or equivalent.

Support is provided through weekend sessions, meetings with supervisors, engagement with and contribution to our University's research culture, networking with peers and the dissemination of research findings at a conference.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/doctorateined_edd

[[Mature Applicants]]
Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

[[Careers]]
If you have worked or currently work in the field of education (at all levels), children and/or youth services or voluntary or community settings - then this course will enhance your professional development by providing the opportunity for you to develop an extended project of research-based study with the intention of making original contributions to the field of educational thought.

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

[[Course Benefits]]
This course provides you with the opportunity to progress your professional learning and development through an extended period of research-based study with the intention of making original contributions to knowledge.

[[Taught Units]]
Research methods (1): Research Approaches, Ethics & Analytical Considerations
This module will cover a range of methodological approaches, data collection and analysis and ethical issues related to the field of educational research.

The Practitioner as Researcher
You will critically review the origins, concepts, field and methodologies of practitioner research within applied and practice-based research in education and related disciplines. As a result you will be able to appraise examples of practitioner research for quality, ethical issues and relevance.

Professional Learning & Dissemination
You will examine and evaluate English education policy and politics across the sector, the nation and throughout the rest of the world in order to critically review the new ways education is being developed through professional practice.

There are no credit points for this course as it is a taught Doctorate with the submitted work leading to your final thesis.

[[Dr Caroline Bligh]]
Senior Lecturer in the School of Education

"The Professional Doctorate in Education is an ideal programme of study as it enables professionals across a wide range of educational careers to pursue a study of unique interest to them whilst continuing in their chosen career paths."

Caroline's rich and varied career has included working as a nurse and primary teacher in London, before being appointed as an English as an additional language co-ordinator here in Leeds. Caroline joined us in 2006 and her research focuses on young children's access to silent spaces in the Early Years environment and the significance of these spaces to their learning.

[[Facilities]]
- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in 100 acres of parkland with easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/
42508| Robert Gordon University| Doctorate of Physiotherapy (DPT)| This course is a unique opportunity to qualify as a Chartered Physiotherapist combined with a PhD leading to a Doctorate in Physiotherapy.

The course will provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to practice physiotherapy through an accelerated programme which builds on prior learning and experience.

The initial two years are run largely in parallel with the MSc (Pre-registration) Physiotherapy course with an enhanced research element that leads to undertaking a Doctoral Thesis in the final 18 months of the course.

After 2 years successful candidates will be awarded the PgDip and will be eligible to apply for Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration which gives eligibility to practice. Successful completion of the final doctoral thesis will then lead to the award of Doctorate of Physiotherapy. The course is also recognised and validated by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP).

[[What you will study]]
There is a firm emphasis on the development of doctorate level research skills in conjunction with the clinical reasoning and practical skills required of a physiotherapist.
Academic modules have been developed to allow students to develop strong core assessment treatment and research skills and a deeper knowledge of core areas such as exercise prescription and health improvement theory. Integrating the core practice areas of cardiovascular respiratory, neurology and musculoskeletal encourages students to think holistically about their patients and to embed this in their practice. The thesis allows the transfer of practical and academic elements to the clinical application of research.

Stage 1
Foundations of Physiotherapy Practice
Exercise And Health
Clinical Education 1
Physiotherapy Practice 1 & 2
Clinical Education 2

Stage 2
Clinical Education 3
Physiotherapy Pathways
Physiotherapy Research Proposal
Clinical Education 4 & 5
Enhancing Service and Practice
Clinical Education 6

Stage 3
Thesis

[[How you will learn]]
The problem orientated model of learning used throughout the course is particularly suited to those who have already experienced a University learning environment. You will be taught via a mixture of enquiry based learning, practical workshops, projects and simulation, working with volunteer patients and in our state of the art Clinical Skills Centre including METIman. During the course, we also frequently invite external speakers including expert clinicians.

Students are required to work in groups and learning occurs through practical and tutorial sessions with some group and individual project work. Experienced tutors with current clinical experienced will facilitate this.

The Doctoral thesis will allow in-depth study of a clinically or service relevant area to PhD level with the student working with a group of experienced clinicians and academics.

[[Additional entry requirements]]
Experience of the research process is an essential requirement for the course. Relevant work experience in the field of Physiotherapy and healthcare would be desirable. Applicants from the USA will also be required to demonstrate that they have undertaken all the prerequisite subjects in accordance with recommendations adopted by the Educational Section of the American Physical therapy Association.

Applicants from other countries should hold an equivalent award in a relevant subject.

All international students, for whom English is not their first language, are required to have an IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of at least 7.0 in all aspects of the test or an appropriate equivalent, on application to the course.

All applicants who pass the application screening stage must attend for a mandatory interview. Interviews are held in North America in April and August each year and in the UK at RGU campus in May and September.

[[How to apply]]
All applications should be made via the University's application form for research students.

Completed application forms should be accompanied by:

-Two academic references
-A transcript or mark sheet for all graduate qualifications
-A draft research proposal, or at least a short summary to indicate the potential area of research (Refer to Section 8 of the Application Form)
-For applicants whose first language or language of university education is not English -Certificate of English language competency score of IELTS 7.0 in each of the four test components (Listening, Reading, Writing, Speaking). Students who can demonstrate successful completion of tertiary (university or college) studies in a country whose national language is English, may be exempted from this requirement

[[Prospects]]
Students will be eligible for HCPC and CSP registration on completion of their DPT after transfer from their PGDip.

A DPT is a requirement for registration in the United States.

The addition of the PhD is likely to add to graduates prospects in clinical research and academic careers.
41897| University of Stirling| Clinical Doctorate in Professional Health Studies| [[Introduction]]

Our Clinical Doctorate is the only one of its kind in Scotland, tailored to the needs of Nurses, Midwives and Allied Health Professionals, of all varieties. The programme is practice-focused and has been designed to prepare future leaders of practice, education and leadership. Students will join other professionals from a range of disciplines for on-campus and online study, to benefit not only from the extensive knowledge delivered by the Clinical Doctorate team, but from each others experiences and expertise.

The School of Health Sciences is well placed to deliver a clinically focused programme such as this. We are a multi-award winning institution, led by a group of world-leading academics, with strong and established research records, real nursing experience and a wealth of world-class publications.

http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/programme-information/prospectus/health-sciences/clinical-doctorates/

[[Who is the Doctorate for?]]

The programme is designed for experienced clinicians who wish to attain the highest goal of becoming ‘clinical academic’. This is the ideal qualification for those who retain a clinical focus with commitment to the improvement of patient care.

Healthcare professionals on the Programme may include; nurses, midwives, dieticians, genetic counsellors, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, speech and language therapists, sport and exercise psychologists and podiatrists.

[[Top reasons to study with us!]]

1. You will join a programme that is unique in Scotland in its clinical focus and differs greatly from all similar programmes in the UK.
2. The blended teaching approach allows you to relate everything you learn, including assignments, directly to what you do in practice and realise the impact this has on your day-to-day work.
3. You will join other learners from a range of clinical backgrounds, learn from one another, and have the opportunity to discuss within a critical space.
4. As a qualified Doctor of Nursing, Midwifery or Professional Health Studies, you will have attained the highest level of academic qualification within your specialism, placing yourself at the forefront of your profession as a recognised, and highly employable expert.

[[Objectives]]

The programme aims to develop you as a clinically focussed senior Nurse, Midwife or Allied Health Professional who will be at the cutting edge of clinical research and practice in your field.

Working autonomously, you will be able to design and execute research to deal with problems and issues in practice and apply constant and integrated approaches to critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of new and complex ideas, information and issues.

In summary, the programme is about:

- Tackling complex ideas and challenging established modes of thinking;
- Developing research and scholarship skills harnessed imaginatively to the field of clinical practice;
- Preparing to be at the cutting edge of clinical and research practice for your area of ‘expertness’;
- Familiarity with leading-edge research, an ability to redesign the clinical environment and understanding of the research process.

[[Structure and Content]]

The programme is designed to challenge and change the way you think. Throughout the programme, your endeavours focus on your own field of practice. You can expect to make a significant difference to your clinical environment right from the very start.

The programme can be studied over three years full-time or, more commonly, over four and eight years on a part-time basis. It consists of three taught modules, an expert practice module and an empirical thesis. Taught components are clustered into two three-day sessions over the first three semesters.

Each taught module is studied over one semester.

- The first module brings you up to date with the latest ideas, findings and methods – taken from across the spectrum of academic research and harnessed imaginatively to your field of practice.

- The second module builds on the first but looks at clinically-applied problem solving to design evidence into fields of practice and organisations. The potential of the research and its impact is part of that design process.

- In the third module we work together to promote a generic knowledge of research methods whilst keeping the clinical relevance of your research in our sights at all times. You also start to more fully develop your research ideas.

- The fourth module is about assessment of your expert practice including its currency and engagement with others. You are also supported to develop your research proposal further.

Following two years of taught modules, you progress to the empirical research stage and ultimately construct a thesis on a topic that will enhance the knowledge base in your field of practice.

Students are well supported through regular face-to-face contact, video conferencing, skype, email and phone. There is tutorial time in preparation for each assignment, and detailed feedback afterward.

[[Delivery and assessment]]

Assessment includes coursework, expert practice examination and the thesis itself. Two active researchers supervise your research project and the programme is supported by face-to-face contact, video-conferencing, email and internet facilities. On-campus attendance is kept to a minimum.

[[Employability]]

Students find a difference in their thinking right from the start and take that different thinking into practice. Within the current body of students, ten have advanced their careers by achieving a promotion during their time on the programme.

[[Career opportunities]]

Professional Doctorates are recognised internationally as a qualification granted to those who have reached the peak of professional and academic achievement in their field of expertise.

Increasingly within the National Health Service (NHS) a Professional Doctorate is seen as an essential academic qualification for progressing to higher level posts within the NHS Agenda for Change career framework.

Graduates have reported benefits of studying a Clinical Doctorate as being: gaining the confidence to see themselves as an expert in their field; the personal fulfilment of achieving the highest academic qualification; enhanced critical and analytical thinking; confidence within specialist areas; the opening of new and advanced career opportunities.

http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/programme-information/prospectus/health-sciences/clinical-doctorates/

[[REF2014]]

1st for Research!

In the research assessment exercise REF2014:

The School of Health Sciences came top for health research in Scotland and was ranked 12th in the UK overall!
41896| University of Stirling| Clinical Doctorate in Midwifery| [[Introduction]]

Our Clinical Doctorate is the only one of its kind in Scotland, tailored to the needs of Nurses, Midwives and Allied Health Professionals, of all varieties. The programme is practice-focused and has been designed to prepare future leaders of practice, education and leadership. Students will join other professionals from a range of disciplines for on-campus and online study, to benefit not only from the extensive knowledge delivered by the Clinical Doctorate team, but from each others experiences and expertise.

The School of Health Sciences is well placed to deliver a clinically focused programme such as this. We are a multi-award winning institution, led by a group of world-leading academics, with strong and established research records, real nursing experience and a wealth of world-class publications.

http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/programme-information/prospectus/health-sciences/clinical-doctorates/

[[Who is the Doctorate for?]]

The programme is designed for experienced clinicians who wish to attain the highest goal of becoming ‘clinical academic’. This is the ideal qualification for those who retain a clinical focus with commitment to the improvement of patient care.

Healthcare professionals on the Programme may include; nurses, midwives, dieticians, genetic counsellors, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, speech and language therapists, sport and exercise psychologists and podiatrists.

[[Top reasons to study with us!]]

1. You will join a programme that is unique in Scotland in its clinical focus and differs greatly from all similar programmes in the UK.
2. The blended teaching approach allows you to relate everything you learn, including assignments, directly to what you do in practice and realise the impact this has on your day-to-day work.
3. You will join other learners from a range of clinical backgrounds, learn from one another, and have the opportunity to discuss within a critical space.
4. As a qualified Doctor of Nursing, Midwifery or Professional Health Studies, you will have attained the highest level of academic qualification within your specialism, placing yourself at the forefront of your profession as a recognised, and highly employable expert.

[[Objectives]]

The programme aims to develop you as a clinically focussed senior Nurse, Midwife or Allied Health Professional who will be at the cutting edge of clinical research and practice in your field.

Working autonomously, you will be able to design and execute research to deal with problems and issues in practice and apply constant and integrated approaches to critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of new and complex ideas, information and issues.

In summary, the programme is about:

- Tackling complex ideas and challenging established modes of thinking;
- Developing research and scholarship skills harnessed imaginatively to the field of clinical practice;
- Preparing to be at the cutting edge of clinical and research practice for your area of ‘expertness’;
- Familiarity with leading-edge research, an ability to redesign the clinical environment and understanding of the research process.

[[Structure and Content]]

The programme is designed to challenge and change the way you think. Throughout the programme, your endeavours focus on your own field of practice. You can expect to make a significant difference to your clinical environment right from the very start.

The programme can be studied over three years full-time or, more commonly, over four and eight years on a part-time basis. It consists of three taught modules, an expert practice module and an empirical thesis. Taught components are clustered into two three-day sessions over the first three semesters.

Each taught module is studied over one semester.

- The first module brings you up to date with the latest ideas, findings and methods – taken from across the spectrum of academic research and harnessed imaginatively to your field of practice.

- The second module builds on the first but looks at clinically-applied problem solving to design evidence into fields of practice and organisations. The potential of the research and its impact is part of that design process.

- In the third module we work together to promote a generic knowledge of research methods whilst keeping the clinical relevance of your research in our sights at all times. You also start to more fully develop your research ideas.

- The fourth module is about assessment of your expert practice including its currency and engagement with others. You are also supported to develop your research proposal further.

Following two years of taught modules, you progress to the empirical research stage and ultimately construct a thesis on a topic that will enhance the knowledge base in your field of practice.

Students are well supported through regular face-to-face contact, video conferencing, skype, email and phone. There is tutorial time in preparation for each assignment, and detailed feedback afterward.

[[Delivery and assessment]]

Assessment includes coursework, expert practice examination and the thesis itself. Two active researchers supervise your research project and the programme is supported by face-to-face contact, video-conferencing, email and internet facilities. On-campus attendance is kept to a minimum.

[[Employability]]

Students find a difference in their thinking right from the start and take that different thinking into practice. Within the current body of students, ten have advanced their careers by achieving a promotion during their time on the programme.

[[Career opportunities]]

Professional Doctorates are recognised internationally as a qualification granted to those who have reached the peak of professional and academic achievement in their field of expertise.

Increasingly within the National Health Service (NHS) a Professional Doctorate is seen as an essential academic qualification for progressing to higher level posts within the NHS Agenda for Change career framework.

Graduates have reported benefits of studying a Clinical Doctorate as being: gaining the confidence to see themselves as an expert in their field; the personal fulfilment of achieving the highest academic qualification; enhanced critical and analytical thinking; confidence within specialist areas; the opening of new and advanced career opportunities.

http://www.stir.ac.uk/postgraduate/programme-information/prospectus/health-sciences/clinical-doctorates/

[[REF2014]]

1st for Research!

In the research assessment exercise REF2014:

The School of Health Sciences came top for health research in Scotland and was ranked 12th in the UK overall!
41867| Liverpool John Moores University| Professional Doctorate in Applied Sport and Exercise Science| This Professional Doctorate in Applied Sport and Exercise Science at Liverpool John Moores University enables you to create and interpret new knowledge associated with your own professional practice in Applied Sport and Exercise Science. The course provides quality supervision and is underpinned by high-grade research.

•Available to study full time (2 years) and part time (4 years)
•Designed to support the creation and interpretation of new professional practice
•Career opportunities in Applied Sport and Exercise Science professional practice and promotion, as well as education, teaching and research

Applied Sport and Exercise Science is an established discipline with growing opportunities for qualified professionals.

Opportunities for professional training at doctoral level are increasingly important for vocational careers within both sport and exercise. The professional doctorate facilitates the creation and interpretation of new professional knowledge. To obtain the award you will need to complete a related Masters programme or MPhil and spend two or more years acquiring a range of supervised skills connected with professional skills, interventions, consultancy, research, and teaching and training (as facilitated through this course).

The programme is underpinned by a strong focus on equipping the future Applied Sport and Exercise Scientists for a range of professional scenarios.

The programme can be studied full time or part time. Full time students must be enrolled for a minimum of two years, and for part-time students this is adjusted pro rata.

You will be developing your skills in teaching and training (education and dissemination), research, consultancy and demonstrating that you have the generic professional skills needed as an Applied Sport and Exercise Scientist. This is achieved through your own work-based learning experiences, taught sessions on the programme and extensive supervision.
41866| Liverpool John Moores University| Professional Doctorate in Sport and Exercise Psychology| This Professional Doctorate in Sport and Exercise Psychology at Liverpool John Moores University is designed to meet the requirements for BPS Stage Two training in Sport and Exercise Psychology and will lead to eligibility for registration with the HCPC. The course provides quality supervision and is underpinned by high-grade research activity.

•This professional doctorate is available to study full time (2 years) and part time (4 years)
•It has been designed to meet the requirements for British Psychological Society Stage 2 training in Sport and Exercise Psychology and the Standards of Education and Training of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)
•Study in the award-winning Tom Reilly Building Building
•Look forward to career opportunities in Sport and Exercise Psychology professional practice and promotion, as well as education, teaching and research.

Sport and Exercise psychology is an exciting new discipline with growing opportunities for qualified professionals.

To become a Sport and Exercise Psychologist, you must have the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership from the British Psychological Society and fulfil a number of requirements.
•Stage 1 training involves the satisfactory completion of an accredited Masters programme (we also offer this Masters at LJMU)
•Stage 2 training includes two or more years spent acquiring a range of supervised skills connected with professional skills, interventions, consultancy, research, teaching and training (as facilitated through this course)

The programme is underpinned by a strong focus on equipping future Sport and Exercise psychologists for a range of professional scenarios.

The programme can be studied full or part time. Full time students must be enrolled for a minimum of two years to meet statutory training requirements. For part time students this is adjusted pro rata.

In keeping with the nationally agreed curriculum competences for Sport and Exercise psychologists, you will be developing your skills in teaching and training (education and dissemination), research, consultancy and demonstrating that you have the generic professional skills needed to qualify as a Sport and Exercise Psychologist. This is achieved through your own work-based learning experiences, taught sessions on the programme and extensive supervision.
41666| Keele University| Criminology and Criminal Justice (Professional Doctorate)| [[Overview]]
The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a 60,000 word thesis.

The DCrim builds on the established and very successful UG and PGT provision in Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School to provide a specialist route for professionals and managers working in the field of criminal justice, or in related fields, who wish to embark on doctoral study located within their own professional discipline and practice. Indeed, this programme focuses on practitioners and professionals in criminal justice (e.g. policing, courts, probation, prison work, alternative sanctions, community sanctions, service providers in the sphere of drugs and addiction, and so on) or related fields of work and practice (e.g. local authority and third sector service providers in the sphere of crime prevention, security, community building and offender rehabilitation; private providers in the above or related spheres; non-governmental action in a variety of spheres such as environmental action, human rights policy and activism, and so on). This list is not exhaustive. Practitioners and professionals working in fields and organisations as diverse as (e.g.) Amnesty International and (e.g.) the Police all share a common sphere of work which is structured around problems and issues of deviance from legal norms.

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/sspp/postgraduatetaught/criminology/professionaldocorate/

[[Course Aims]]
- Promote an understanding of research evidence and methodologies relevant to professional practitioners.

- Develop a critical awareness of the policy context in which professional practice takes place.

- Enable participants to undertake a research study of relevance to their professional activities.

[[Course Content]]
Module 1 (30 credits) Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher (EDU-40106)
Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

Module 2 (30 credits) Critical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice
Assignment: Theoretical perspectives essay

Module 3 (30 credits) Research methods and evaluation (EDU-40103)
Assignment: A general research methods critique

Module 4 (30 credits) The pilot study (EDU-40105)
Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

Module 5 (60 credits) Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal (EDU-40107)
This is a summative assignment comprising a written research proposal and an oral presentation

Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis
This will be up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis

[[Teaching & Assessment]]
The programme is assessed by four formative assignments, one summative assignment and a Research Thesis.

[[Additional Costs]]
Additional costs for textbooks, inter-library loans, photocopying, printing, and potential overdue library fines.

No other additional costs for this postgraduate programme are anticipated.

[[Award Pathway Option]]
Upon successful completion of the taught part of the DCrim programme and a 15-20,000 word mini-thesis, students may be awarded an MRes (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/
41665| Plymouth University| Business Administration (DBA)| Are you a senior manager, consultant or entrepreneur who wants to draw together both the theoretical and practical aspects of leadership and managerial experience? Designed to enable you to develop professional practice, theoretical understanding and reflexive capability, the Doctorate in Business Administration (DBA) is a high level, innovative qualification and an alternative route if you wish to research your professional practice at doctorate level.

[[Key features]]
Enjoy being central to the progress of the course - the DBA assumes that your organisation and society are continually changing, and will relate these issues to wider theoretical questions.

Further your understanding of leadership and change and, through the study of specific situations, make general conclusions about practical problems.

Develop a creative mind in relation to individual perspectives and organisational contexts.

Benefit from direct involvement with the Plymouth Graduate School of Management research community.

Gain new perspectives and learn precise methodological approaches that add value in terms of effectiveness, capability and efficiency.​

[[Course details]]
You will undertake an individual research project drawing on your practical experience and theoretical frameworks. Initially there is an emphasis on close direction through workshops, presentations and written papers. On the basis of the written papers and a research proposal, the second phase involves the completion of a thesis. You will be expected to concentrate on an issue directly related to your workplace, such as solving a problem or identifying new operational procedures. Before you start your thesis, you’ll agree your area of research with the University, individual student and any other participating organisations. Individual tuition and supervision will be available to you for the duration of the programme.

[[Applying]]
The University aims to make the application procedure as simple and efficient as possible. Our Postgraduate Admissions and Enquiries team are on hand to offer help and can put you in touch with the appropriate faculty if you wish to discuss any programme in detail. If you have a disability and would like further information about the support provided by Plymouth University, please visit our Disability Assist Services website. Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email international-admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.
41650| Plymouth University| Public Administration (DPA)| Are you a senior manager within the public sector or local government who wants to draw together both the theoretical and practical aspects of professional and managerial experience? Focused on managerial and organisational practice, this programme provides opportunities for learning through collaborative processes, and enables you to take your new knowledge back to the workplace where it can be implemented to improve the quality of your practice.

[[Key features]]
Immerse yourself in the policies and theories surrounding public administration, through our two year taught programme. Build on your newly acquired knowledge and develop your research interests, by taking an additional two to three years to complete your thesis.

Equip yourself with the skills to facilitate in others the capacity to manage public resources cost-efficiently, cost-effectively and equitably.

Gain knowledge to guide, and contribute to, socio-political discourses at all levels, on the future roles of the state, civil society and the market in societal and local community governance.

Sharpen your knowledge and feel able to give sound policy advice to government across an array of policy domains.

Enhance your ability by applying theory to practice in the contexts of critical public policy and administration issues in a way that draws upon your extensive professional and managerial experience.

Benefit from direct involvement with the Plymouth Graduate School of Management research community.

[[Course details]]
Year 1: You will start the programme with an induction and introduction to doctoral research. You will then engage in reflective practice, reflexivity and participatory research, and identify and explain theory. History and philosophy of public policy and social sciences and understanding paradigms of inquiry will be covered before you begin to develop methodological approaches. You will then work towards your research proposal and thesis.

Year 2: You'll build on the knowledge and skills gained during your first year, and continue to study your chosen taught modules. After you’ve completed your second year, and the taught phase of your Doctorate, you’ll then have an additional two to three years to complete your thesis.

[[Applying]]
The University aims to make the application procedure as simple and efficient as possible. Our Postgraduate Admissions and Enquiries team are on hand to offer help and can put you in touch with the appropriate faculty if you wish to discuss any programme in detail. If you have a disability and would like further information about the support provided by Plymouth University, please visit our Disability Assist Services website. Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email international-admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.
40684| University of Liverpool| Orthodontics DDSc| This programme fulfils the need for dental practitioners to have access to a higher dental degree which provides advanced clinical training Orthodontics.

The Professional Doctorate is a research qualification that contains Professional Skills Training. This qualification is currently offered in Orthodontics, with the first annual intake enrolled in October 2008. In addition the Doctorate prepares candidates for the examinations of surgical Royal Colleges leading to the award of Membership in Orthodontics or further orthodontic qualifications. Applicants should already have passed the FDS/ MFDS examination or an equivalent. Funded specialist trainee appointments are competitively available to appropriately qualified candidates on this programme with application through the national recruitment process.

[[Why School of Dentistry?]]

Excellent facilities and equipment

A recent £6m investment programme's dramatically upgraded our teaching and research facilities, and created additional postgraduate places.

Here are some of the key features:-

New sedation and oral surgery suites
State-of-the-art training facilities
New tutorial rooms
Enhanced patient facilities
New research laboratories, closely integrated with clinical areas and featuring extensive, state-of-the-art equipment
A new Oral Health Suite with dedicated research facility within a clinical area of the hospital
Refurbished lecture theatres, multi-skills suites, teaching rooms and Student Common Room.
High quality school laboratories

Specialist dentistry

We accommodate many specialist dentistry interests through our partnership with the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust.

Together we've created state-of-the-art facilities for specialist dentistry research and education, including the management of clinical trials to a high level of clinical governance.

Wide range of programmes

Programmes in the School of Dentistry extend from short courses, aimed at updating the general dental practitioner, to full-time studentships leading to higher degrees, with a large variety of research based or professional training programmes in between. We also have a steadily expending menu of verifiable CPD courses for all members of the dental team.

[[Career prospects]]

Career Opportunities for DDSc Orthodontic graduates mainly consist of:

Specialist Orthodontic Practice - orthodontist
Hospital Orthodontist or Consultant
University – Clinical academic
40683| University of Liverpool| Endodontics DDSC| This programme fulfils the need for dental practitioners to have access to a higher dental degree which provides specialist clinical training in Endodontics.

The Professional Doctorate is a research qualification that contains Professional Skills Training. Students who successfully complete the DDSc programme in Endodontics will be awarded the DDSc (Endodontics) from the University of Liverpool and a MEndo from the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) of Edinburgh. Both Endodontics Specialist Curriculum and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh blueprints in Endodontics are embedded into the programme.

Honorary National Training Numbers leading to CCST may be available to suitable candidates with full GDC registration who satisfy the entry requirements to specialty clinical training in Endodontics as determined by the General Dental Council.

[[Why School of Dentistry?]]

Excellent facilities and equipment

A recent £6m investment programme's dramatically upgraded our teaching and research facilities, and created additional postgraduate places.

Here are some of the key features:-

New sedation and oral surgery suites
State-of-the-art training facilities
New tutorial rooms
Enhanced patient facilities
New research laboratories, closely integrated with clinical areas and featuring extensive, state-of-the-art equipment
A new Oral Health Suite with dedicated research facility within a clinical area of the hospital
Refurbished lecture theatres, multi-skills suites, teaching rooms and Student Common Room.
High quality school laboratories

Specialist dentistry

We accommodate many specialist dentistry interests through our partnership with the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust.

Together we've created state-of-the-art facilities for specialist dentistry research and education, including the management of clinical trials to a high level of clinical governance.

Wide range of programmes

Programmes in the School of Dentistry extend from short courses, aimed at updating the general dental practitioner, to full-time studentships leading to higher degrees, with a large variety of research based or professional training programmes in between. We also have a steadily expending menu of verifiable CPD courses for all members of the dental team.

[[Career prospects]]

Students studying this course normally follow careers in:

- Dental Practice as endodontist
- Hospital as Endodontist or consultant in Endodontics
- University as clinical academic
40620| Imperial College London| Doctoral Programme| Applications are open for PhD studentships at Imperial College Business School, a top 10 global university*. We are looking for exceptional candidates to join our world-leading research team in September 2016. All students on our Doctoral programme will receive fully-funded studentships.

[[Our Doctoral Programme]]
Our full-time, five year programme offers an inspirational learning experience that equips you with the skills to become a world-leading expert in your chosen subject. Our programme combines highly relevant and structured training in the first year when you complete a Master's in Research, with the freedom to explore your chosen area of research over the course of a further four years.

[[Our research culture]]
Our aim is to drive business advantage through the fusion of business and technology.
At Imperial College Business School, our research meets the highest standards of academic excellence and rigour, yet produces knowledge that is relevant for practice.

We are looking for excellent candidates with strong and innovative research proposals to begin their doctoral studies in the areas of:
• Finance
• Innovation and Entrepreneurship
• Management

The Business School also houses a number of specialist research centres where many of our doctoral students collaborate on exciting research projects with faculty and industry partners.
Some of these include:
• Brevan Howard Centre for Financial Analysis
• Centre for Health Policy
• Centre for Management Buyout Research
• Enterprise Research Centre
• KPMG Centre for Advanced Business Analytics
• Risk Management Laboratory

[[Studentships available]]
Studentship applications are now open for students with an outstanding academic background. All students on our Doctoral programme are offered fully-funded places by the Business School, including a full tuition fee waiver and a living stipend for up to five years. Our Doctoral programme has one intake each year in September. The deadline for our 2016 intake is Monday 11 January 2016 and early application is recommended.


*Ranked 9th in the world, THE World University Rankings 2014-2015, joint 2nd in the QS World University Rankings 2014. The Business School has the highest proportion of ‘world-leading' and ‘internationally excellent' research in the UK (Research Excellence Framework, 2014).'
40363| University of Birmingham| Forensic Clinical Psychology Doctorate (ForenClinPsyD)| This Doctorate programme in Forensic Clinical Psychology is aimed at psychologists wishing to work in forensic and clinical settings who need skills from both forensic and clinical disciplines. Self funding trainees will also be considered. The programme is four years long in duration, and took its first intake of five trainees in September 2013.

Approval for the programme has been granted by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation has been received from the British Psychological Society (BPS) for dual recognition in Forensic and Clinical Psychology.

Candidates who complete the programme successfully will be eligible to become Chartered Forensic and Clinical Psychologists within the BPS and to apply for registration with the HCPC as Forensic and Clinical Psychologists.

The programme seeks to train reflective scientist-practitioners who are able to use their core knowledge and skills to formulate problems in psychological terms and draw creatively on theories and techniques from the discipline of psychology to find feasible solutions to a wide range of presenting issues, considering both clinical and forensic approaches, and in both clinical and forensic contexts.

There is an increasing need in prisons and in the community for skills that draw upon both forensic and clinical disciplines. A large number of individuals within prison and probation settings have mental health problems, while those in forensic mental health settings need robust risk assessment to identify criminogenic need and inform release decisions.

The programme is deliberately generic to promote flexibility but also emphasises evidence-based practice. In line with NICE guidelines and the ‘What Works’ approach, special consideration is given to cognitive-behavioural approaches.

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open day (Friday 4 March 2016). Register to attend at: www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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