Welcome to Find A Professional Doctorate

    A Database of Professional Doctorate Programmes Worldwide

    This site lists doctoral qualifications aimed at those working in nursing, engineering, psychology, law, social work, education and a growing number of other professions.


    Latest Professional Doctorates

    63937| Grenoble Ecole de Management| Doctorate of Business Administration (DBA)|

    Grenoble Ecole de Management offers a unique Executive Doctorate of Business Administration degree in both France and the USA.

    The degree is delivered by GEM and the workshops take place primarily Online for the convenience of busy executives, at our partner campus in Los Angeles, California, or at our campuses in Paris and Grenoble, France

    Why the GEM DBA?

    • Oldest program in Europe with nearly 30 years of experience
    • Strong global network of over 500 alumni
    • Degree from top-ranked, triple-accredited business school
    • One of only 10 DBA programs in the world to be accredited by AMBA
    • Member of EDBAC (Executive DBA Council)
    • Accompanied by International Subject Matter Experts. Faculty strongly engaged in producing world-class research
    • Online, flexible format – adapted to busy executives

    Overview

    The DBA program at Grenoble Ecole de Management is the oldest DBA in Europe. It offers senior managers, independent consultants, and academics the opportunity to leverage their careers and/or to make a transition into academia. The DBA is a program for those seeking to link corporate experience to rigorous and relevant research. It connects the business and research communities to enact change and foster progress through original and publishable research work.

    As a triple-accredited business school (AACSB, AMBA, and EQUIS), Grenoble Ecole de Management has designed a program that fits executives’ needs with the highest quality standards: we see the DBA program as a true research-based degree. From Day 1, participants start working on their research, and the program is designed to ensure that students carry out long-term research projects that are highly relevant to management practice and are based on up-to-date scientific knowledge.

    The content of the workshops focuses on the development of research methods. All applicants have managerial expertise and a Master’s/MBA degree; therefore, the courses do not repeat the content of MBA studies. Our DBA approach leads to intellectual contributions, as demonstrated by our students’ and graduates’ outstanding publication records.

    Locations

    The Grenoble DBA is delivered Online and based in France or the USA:

    ·        DBA France: Paris & Grenoble

    ·        DBA USA: Los Angeles

    Regardless of the location, the content is the same and participants who successfully complete the program are awarded a Grenoble Ecole de Management DBA degree.

    Why Choose a DBA Program?

    DBA Impact:

    Our DBA students’ research influences managerial and organizational milieus at the highest level. Each student’s thesis includes a chapter dedicated to the managerial implications of their doctoral research and offers relevant recommendations for organizations to overcome key challenges.

    DBA students and graduates are encouraged to share their results and findings with the widest possible audience in order to inform and engage with their peers, organizations, and communities.

    With a strong focus on dissemination to business and academic audiences, the combination of relevance and rigor in our DBA research supports our reputation in the management of technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

    The GEM DBA enables students to:

    • Understand state-of-the-art research in their fields of study;
    • Acquire the necessary understanding and expertise in methods and techniques for research design, data collection, and data analysis;
    • Conduct, write, and disseminate high -quality-doctoral-level research;
    • Achieve a greater level of effectiveness as a professional practitioner in managing technology, innovation, and change; and
    • Gain legitimacy as researchers and faculty members in both academic and non-academic environments

    Your DBA Supervisor

    Each DBA candidate is assigned a research-active professor from Grenoble Ecole de Management or a partner institution. Our Faculty provides a wide range of expertise and an international reputation in research on business innovation, technology management and the organizational dimensions of technological change. The supervisor helps the student define and carry out a DBA research project until his or her final thesis defense.

    Faculty who supervise doctoral students at GEM have the opportunity to work with candidates who have met our demanding selection criteria. These students are often given privileged access to top-tier research in the fields of business and organizations, which provides them exciting opportunities for high-impact, novel research and joint publications.

    Employability

    Careers

    500 + graduates / 1500+ intellectual contributions/ 25+ years doctoral experience/ GEM: DBA European pioneer

    Companies

    The DBA program at GEM offers senior managers, independent consultants, and senior academics the opportunity to leverage their careers and/or to make a transition into the highest levels of academia. The DBA is a degree for those seeking to link corporate experience to rigorous and relevant research.

    The DBA acts as a lever for rewarding careers. For students and graduates, there is an opportunity to launch or reinforce careers. Our DBA graduates hold full-time and part-time faculty positions in accredited schools and share their experiences through pedagogy and research.

    Those working in commercial or public organizations benefit from new legitimacy as recognized experts in their fields.

    Program Structure

    The Doctorate of Business Administration (DBA) program is divided into two stages:

    Stage I: Training in Doctoral Reseach in Management Sciences

    Philosophy, Methods and Tools (18 to 24 months, part-time study)

    Stage II: Thesis

    (18 to 24 months, part-time study)

    63913| University of Edinburgh| Doctor of Dental Surgery DDS|

    The Doctor of Dental Surgery is a research based qualification that can be taken either full time or part time.

    The programme is aimed at those in the dental profession who wish to develop high level research skills by pursuing original research in the field of study, relating particular research to the general body of knowledge in the field, and presenting the results of the researches in a critical and scholarly way.

    Edinburgh Dental Institute (EDI) works in partnership with two major organisations to deliver high quality education, research and patient care.

    The activities of EDI are as a result of strong cooperation and collaboration between the University of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, NHS Education for Scotland and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

    Training and support

    Our welcoming and friendly environment offers great opportunities for high quality education and research.

    Our transferable skills programme delivers generic training in presentation, project management and writing skills.

    Facilities

    The EDI was established in 1999 to develop education opportunities for dental postgraduates and the dental team.

    We have excellent facilities and are situated centrally within the historic and vibrant capital of Scotland.

    We are located in Lauriston Place in central Edinburgh and occupy the top three floors of the Lauriston Building, a dedicated out-patient centre for dentistry and a number of other medical disciplines.

    63731| University of Wolverhampton| Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology|

    Professional doctorates are structured doctoral programmes with taught elements that address aspects of theory, practice and research. They are equivalent in time, intellectual demand and academic outcomes to those of a traditional PhD.

    Professional Doctorate students make a contribution to both theory and practice in their field, and develop professional practice by making a contribution to (professional) knowledge primarily through advanced supervised research written up as a thesis.

    Professional Doctorate courses:

    • Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology
    • Professional Doctorate in Health & Wellbeing 
    • Professional Doctorate In Educational Enquiry (EdD)

    The Professional Doctorate courses are currently in the process of revalidation and are closed for entry however if you are interested in applying for 2021/22 admission please email [email protected] with your course preference and contact details (email and telephone number) and we will send you an email notification once the links are open for you to apply. Thank you for your patience.

    Life as a research student

    You’ll have all of the benefits of being part of the University of Wolverhampton. You’ll have the option to stay in our student accommodation, you can join all of the Students Union sports clubs and societies and you’ll have access to the same student services. As well as this, you will be part of the Doctoral College, and be able to take advantage of our excellent Research Skills Development Programme.

    Studying for a research degree is an intensive and demanding commitment; that is why, across the university, considerable practical and academic support is offered to all research students. During your studies you will be supported by a supervisory team who will guide you in the development of your project. They will offer advice and encouragement at every stage, helping you to develop increasing independence as you gain knowledge of your field. 

    Don't take our word for it, meet some of our current research students and see what they have to say about studying at Wolverhampton.

    63730| University of Wolverhampton| Professional Doctorate in Health & Wellbeing|

    Professional doctorates are structured doctoral programmes with taught elements that address aspects of theory, practice and research. They are equivalent in time, intellectual demand and academic outcomes to those of a traditional PhD.

    Professional Doctorate students make a contribution to both theory and practice in their field, and develop professional practice by making a contribution to (professional) knowledge primarily through advanced supervised research written up as a thesis.

    Professional Doctorate courses:

    • Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology
    • Professional Doctorate in Health & Wellbeing 
    • Professional Doctorate In Educational Enquiry (EdD)

    The Professional Doctorate courses are currently in the process of revalidation and are closed for entry however if you are interested in applying for 2021/22 admission please email [email protected] with your course preference and contact details (email and telephone number) and we will send you an email notification once the links are open for you to apply. Thank you for your patience.

    Life as a research student

    You’ll have all of the benefits of being part of the University of Wolverhampton. You’ll have the option to stay in our student accommodation, you can join all of the Students Union sports clubs and societies and you’ll have access to the same student services. As well as this, you will be part of the Doctoral College, and be able to take advantage of our excellent Research Skills Development Programme.

    Studying for a research degree is an intensive and demanding commitment; that is why, across the university, considerable practical and academic support is offered to all research students. During your studies you will be supported by a supervisory team who will guide you in the development of your project. They will offer advice and encouragement at every stage, helping you to develop increasing independence as you gain knowledge of your field. 

    Don't take our word for it, meet some of our current research students and see what they have to say about studying at Wolverhampton.

    63550| York St John University| Professional Doctorate in Ministry (DMin)|

    On this programme, the learning style is informal and collegiate. There is a strong emphasis in the first two years on developing your writing. You will critically engage with key ideas and develop a research project. The collegiality continues into stage two as you write your doctoral thesis. At this point there will be extended opportunities to share ideas and issues with fellow students and supervisors.

    An unusual feature of this DMin is that the taught modules are shared with professionals studying for the Professional Doctorate in Education and the Professional Doctorate in Religion. This allows for cross-collaboration and cross-discipline support.

    You will see how broad theoretical ideas can be applied to specific contexts, and how to apply concepts and ideas to the questions you'd like to explore. In addition, you will use the tools of practical and empirical theology to foster reflection and ensure that your research brings together both empirical and theological insights.

    We recognise the pressures you face as a professional and how these can vary over the course of a year. Because of this, delivery in stage one is designed to concentrate the writing of assignments outside the busiest times of the academic and church calendar.

    The four compulsory taught modules are delivered two per year, in the first two years, over a four-day teaching block – one in February and one in May. Outside of these times there are half-day sessions and online contact which enables you to keep in touch and gain regular feedback.

    Course structure

    Modules include:

    • Identifying and articulating issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Contextualising issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Researching issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Influencing and impacting on issues in professional practice (45 credits)

    Teaching and assessment

    You will complete a research thesis, attend a four-day residential element once a year and receive individual supervision from a team of experts. Your 50,000 word thesis is based on an original piece of research.

    Essays are marked on a pass-fail basis. However, we do indicate the overall standard so that you can gauge the level of writing required for good doctoral work.

    The thesis is treated as per a PhD thesis, and will be assessed by the same processes by both internal and external examiners.

    63549| York St John University| Professional Doctorate in Religion (DRel)|

    This doctoral programme introduces you to issues that relate to you as a professional minister embarking on research. You will also addresses issues related to your ministry.

    The learning style is informal and collegiate. There is a strong emphasis on enabling you to develop your writing. You will also focus on critically engaging with key ideas, and developing a research project. The collegiality continues into stage two as you write your doctoral thesis. At this point there will be extended opportunities to share ideas and issues with fellow students and supervisors.

    An unusual feature of this DRel is that the taught modules are shared with professionals from various backgrounds who are studying for the Professional Doctorate in Education and the Professional Doctorate in Ministry. You will see how broad theoretical ideas can be applied to specific contexts, and how to apply concepts and ideas to the questions you'd like to explore. In addition, you will use the tools of practical and empirical theology to foster reflection and ensure that your research brings together both empirical and theological insights.

    Course structure

    Modules include:

    • Identifying and articulating issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Contextualising issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Researching issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Influencing and impacting on issues in professional practice (45 credits)

    Teaching and assessment

    Teaching is geared to doctoral students. Most sessions consist of seminar-style dialogue and debate. You'll be expected to read the set material in advance and staff will work with you to engage with the ideas and discourses that suit your interests and needs.

    We consider that as a doctoral student, you will learn best by doing. This will include producing drafts that help you to form your writing style and distinctive researcher voice.

    In year one you will have fixed points at which you need to submit drafts of your two 8,000-word essays. You will then receive detailed feedback from your course leaders and supervisors. The following year, and the thesis stage, will follow a similar pattern.

    The four compulsory taught modules are delivered two per year, in the first two years, over a four-day teaching block – one in February and one in May. Outside of these times there are half-days and online contact which enables you to keep in touch and gain regular feedback.

    63540| York St John University| Professional Doctorate in Education|

    On this doctoral programme you will investigate issues that relate to you as an education professional. There will be a focus on areas that shape the context in which you're conducting your research.

    The learning style is informal and collegiate. There is a strong emphasis in the first two years on developing your writing. You will also focus on critically engaging with key ideas and developing a research project. The collegiality continues into stage two as you write your doctoral thesis. At this point there will be extended opportunities to share ideas and issues with fellow students and supervisors.

    An unusual feature of this doctorate is that the taught modules are shared with professionals from a variety of backgrounds. This allows us to quickly identify the common issues faced by professionals embarking on doctoral-level research. You will see how broad theoretical ideas can be fruitfully applied to specific contexts, and how to apply concepts and ideas to the questions you'd like to explore.

    To be admitted to stage two you will need to pass all four modules in stage one. You will also need to successfully pitch your thesis proposal at a transfer panel. Stage two can last between two and four years. During this time you'll keep in touch with us at the May teaching session and individually with your supervisors at other times. Supervisory meetings may be in person or online.

    Course structure

    • Identifying and articulating issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Contextualising issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Researching issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Influencing and impacting on issues in professional practice (45 credits)
    • Doctoral thesis (360 credits)

    Teaching and assessment

    Most sessions consist of seminar-style dialogue and debate. You'll be expected to read the set material in advance and staff will work with you to engage with the ideas and discourses that best suit your interests and needs.

    We consider that as a doctoral student, you will learn best through practical application. This will include producing drafts that help you to form your writing style and distinctive researcher voice.

    In the first year you will have fixed points at which you need to submit drafts of your two 8000-word essays. You will then receive detailed feedback from your course leaders and supervisors. The following year, and the thesis stage, will follow a similar pattern.

    Essays are marked on a pass/fail basis. However, we do indicate the overall standard so that you can gauge the level of writing required for good doctoral work.

    All four modules must be passed for you to be accepted on to stage two.

    The thesis is treated as per a PhD thesis, and will be assessed by the same processes by both internal and external examiners.

    63374| Anglia Ruskin University ARU| DProf - Professional Doctorate in Health and Social Care|

    This programme is for health or social care practitioners with postgraduate qualifications who want to research a policy or practice issue that’s relevant to their area of work and use the findings to influence the way things are done.

    The Professional Doctorate in Health and Social Care (DProfHSC) provides an opportunity to plan and undertake doctoral research with the aim of developing an area of professional practice and make an original contribution to existing knowledge.

    The DProfHSC is undertaken in two stages. In Stage 1 you will undertake four 30 credit Level 7 modules, including:

    • Advanced Professional Practice
    • Critically Reviewing the Evidence
    • Advanced Research Approaches
    • Advanced Research Methods

    During the structured first stage of the programme, you’ll develop your research ideas with the help of an academic advisor. Study days, workshops and online resources provide research training and orientation leading to the submission of a research proposal.

    With your proposal formally approved, you’ll then progress to the supervised research stage of your higher-level degree, developing your thesis with support from your supervisors. In stage 2, you must achieve your Confirmation of Registration and your progress will be appraised at Annual Reviews.  

    Throughout both stages of the programme you are supported by advisers and supervisors who have broad areas of interest in the field of health and social care, along with a range of methodological expertise.

    You will also actively engage with the Faculty's and the University's research training and activities, including conferences, seminar programmes, invited speakers and much more. The programme concludes in the submission of your final thesis and a ‘viva voce’ examination to defend it.

    Supervision and support

    We can support and supervise doctoral students in most areas of health and social care. Please contact us to discuss this further.

    Your faculty

    The Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care is the largest in ARU, with over 7,000 students. Our Faculty is teeming with expertise and primed to meet the demand for creating health professionals, teachers, doctors, scientists and educators for the three districts we serve: Chelmsford, Cambridge and Peterborough.

    We have been training undergraduates for professional roles for over 25 years, with a reputation for quality, dedication and ambition balanced with student satisfaction.

    We know that to give our students the very best experiential learning, prior to getting into the workplace, simulation is second to none, for safe, realistic, learning environments. We have invested heavily in purpose built simulated wards, science labs and skills space, to support our students through their learning.

    ARU research

    Anglia Ruskin's academic excellence was recognised in 2014, as part of the Research Excellence Framework (REF), an exercise which assesses the quality of academic research. Twelve areas of our work were classed as generating world-leading research. The results showed that we're making a significant impact on economies, societies, the environment and culture in all corners of the globe.

    Careers

    You’ll receive comprehensive postgraduate training and develop transferrable skills that will equip you for your research project and wider career.

    These skills include research planning, use of research methods and techniques, development of theoretical concepts, research analysis, conference presentation, academic writing and publishing.

    We’ll encourage you to publish articles during your research project and present your findings at conferences, including those we hold here at the University.

    Many of our research graduates enhance their careers by using their findings to recommend new policies or pilot new practice, locally or nationally. 

    62777| University of Central Lancashire| Criminal Justice - DProf|

    About the course

    The Professional Doctorate in Criminal Justice develops current and aspiring criminal justice professionals to operate confidently at a strategic level, providing skills to drive evidence-based change and improve criminal justice performance. You’ll develop a critical awareness of topics at the forefront of criminal justice and the contexts and theories that influence practice in these areas.

    The bespoke qualification can be tailored to professional requirements, thereby increasing the potential for personal development and career progression. Online resources also provide the flexibility to study when and where it suits you, within a guided and structured framework. The course is taught by lecturers with frontline experience in criminal justice organisations and those who are research active in this area.  

    LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

    Extensive resources are available to support your studies (ie SPSS) provided by LIS- library and IT staff. 

    LIS provide access to a huge range of electronic resources - e-journals and databases, eBooks, images and texts. As this course is exclusively online, the programme will make extensive use of Blackboard (eLearn), which promotes access to a variety of resources and materials designed to meet the learning needs of distance learning students.

    The course team is led by Professor Stuart Kirby, Ph.D., C.Psychol. Stuart served within Lancashire Police between 1977 – 2007 in a variety of uniform and detective roles retiring as Detective Chief Superintendent, Specialist Crime and Operations Division. Since then he has worked at Lancaster University and latterly at The University of Central Lancashire. His Ph.D. was on the subject of Child Sex Offenders and he has conducted research and published widely in the area of policing, crime reduction, and serious and organised crime. He has also designed and presented Criminal Justice lectures and programmes to academic audiences and Criminal Justice Agencies in the UK and internationally (Europe, UAE, India, North America, Australia).

    The Professional Doctorate course is delivered by a diverse range of experienced research/practitioner active staff from within the School of Forensic and Applied Sciences and other schools. You can access information (e.g. about staff research interest and publications) via staff profiles (available through the appropriate School web pages). In addition specialist staff such as those from the University Learning Information Service may contribute to modules where their particular expertise will enhance your learning experience.

    INDUSTRY LINKS

    Established professional links with Lancashire Constabulary and other law enforcement agencies, regionally, nationally and internationally. Mixed skill set within Prof Doc students provides a great networking experience.

    • Youth Offending Teams
    • National Health Service
    • Local Government
    • Prisons
    • National Crime Agency
    • Crown Prosecution Service
    • Her Majesty Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC)
    • Good links with Poland, Prague, Budapest and Netherlands law enforcement agencies.

    The Professional Doctorate course is delivered by a diverse range of experienced research/practitioner active staff from within the School of Forensic and Applied Sciences and other schools. In addition specialist staff such as those from the University Learning Information Service may contribute to modules where their particular expertise will enhance your learning experience.

    62664| Bournemouth University| PhD - Faculty of Science & Technology|

    From Archaeology & Anthropology to Environmental & Biological Sciences, Technology, Security, Design & Engineering, or Psychology, research within the Faculty of Science & Technology is world-leading.

    The faculty also hosts four interdisciplinary research centres and one research institute: Ageing and Dementia Research CentreInterdisciplinary Neuroscience Research CentreCentre for Ecology, Environment and Sustainability and Institute for Studies in Landscape and Human Evolution.

    Our close links to many local and national heritage sites and projects also make this an excellent place to undertake archaeological and anthropological research, and we support research in these fields that has an impact on modern forensic investigation. You could make a difference in the world of technology and have an impact on saving lives or rehabilitation, or work with our psychologists to improve every day life.

    We work closely with colleagues from other faculties and specialisms across the university to deliver impactful and exciting research across a multitude of disciplines.

    62613| University of Limerick| Human Performance and Innovation - Professional Doctorate|

    The Professional Doctorate (PD) in Human Performance (4-year part-time, Level 10 NFQ, 270 ECTS) and Innovation provides an opportunity for professionals in human behaviour and performance (e.g. sport, high level performance, physical activity behaviour and promotion related to health and education sectors) to engage in an advanced degree characterised by a systematic and multi-disciplinary implementation and evaluation of targeted and necessary innovations. The programme is delivered exclusively through e-learning modalities.

    The premise of the PD in Human Performance and Innovation recognises that mature practitioners, embedded in professional environments, already have substantial domain-specific knowledge, expertise and experiences. The programme of study is customised to the learning and development needs of the doctoral candidate. The PD route thus offers practitioners a personally tailored programme of study designed to drive, implement and evaluate beneficial innovations within their realm of expertise and serve their future career ambitions.

    Overview

    • The aim of the Professional Doctorate in Human performance and innovation is to provide experienced practitioners with enhanced skills and knowledge to enabling them to envision, evolve, theoretically substantiate and rigorously evaluate, novel innovations beneficial to their specific domains of expertise. Upon successful completion of the programme students will be able to:                           
    • Appraise existing knowledge and practice and apply translational research methodologies to create innovative solutions to industry practice and challenges within their professional domain.
    • Evaluate current industry practice and propose, develop and implement alternative and more effective approaches.
    • Combine multi-disciplinary knowledge and abilities of self and others to resolve complex “real world” challenges in order to innovate and transform professional practice.
    • Innovatively apply new developments and initiatives applicable to their professional practice and industry domain whilst increasing ability to draw upon practices and innovations from other knowledge fields and sectors.
    • Adopt creative dissemination strategies to effectively communicate their innovation findings to a wide range of audiences within their professional field.
    • Integrate management and applied practice skills, such as leadership, planning, change management and multi-disciplinary approaches necessary to resolve current complex issues and develop new innovations necessary to implement positive change in their field of professional practice.
    • Determine applications of their research for individuals, circumstances and organisations both within and outside their professional field.
    • Determine and develop future goals and areas of development within their own professional and industry practice.
    • Work independently and collaborate effectively as part of a multi-disciplinary team involving a variety of professional colleagues and partners.
    • Demonstrate creativity in problem solving and identifying innovative cutting edge solutions to complex challenges within their domain and pushing the boundaries of professional practice.
    • Conceptualise the research process and how it is applied and translated to professional practice.
    • Apply ethical principles to conducting research within their professional domain.
    • Devise based on effective self-reflection skills an ongoing personal and professional development plan identifying strengths and areas in need of further development.
    • Enhance their professional practice through systematic enquiry and development and demonstrate the relevance of their learning to their own professional context.

    Programme Content

    The programme involves both a taught (72 ECTS) and a professional innovation/research component (198 ECTS). The programme is delivered exclusively through e-learning modalities such as online lectures, discussion boards, webinars and linked questions and answers forums and one to one online supervision tutorials and discussion. The learning experience is primarily self-directed which is supported by digital/online interaction with the doctoral supervisors of the candidate. The scheduling of online interactions will be flexible and agreed between doctoral candidate and supervisor/tutor. The primary assessment modes will be written and oral presentation and defence, critical written review of extant literature and engagement with knowledge translation and dissemination activities.

    Relevant and recent developments and research findings will at all stages be incorporated into the candidate learning experience. This will occur by default via the engagement with and critical evaluation of the extant literature. In addition, the relevant professional contexts, practices and experiences of the candidate and others who work in similar, related and different professional contexts will be integrated into the candidate learning experience. The engagement of a 2nd internal/external supervisor who has specialist knowledge in the innovation identified by the candidate will be targeted. 

    62612| University of Limerick| Healthcare Practice - Professional Doctorate|

    The Professional Doctorate in Healthcare Practice programme will facilitate students to develop advanced skills in designing and conducting research and practice based inquiry relevant to their own area of practice. These skills are applicable to a variety of careers in healthcare, government and non-profit (voluntary) organisations.

    Overview

    The Professional Doctorate in Healthcare Practice programme will facilitate students to develop advanced skills in designing and conducting research and practice based inquiry relevant to their own area of practice. These skills are applicable to a variety of careers in healthcare, government and non-profit (voluntary) organisations.The Professional Doctorate in Healthcare Practice programme will highlight specialist and transferable research skills within a programme consisting of taught modules and research thesis conducted over three years (full-time) or five years (part-time). The programme was developed and designed in conjunction with health service partners.

    Details

    • Level 10 Doctoral Programme
    • Full-time (3 years) or Part-time (6 years)
    • One intake per year (September)
    • Open to all Health Care Professionals (Inter-professional)

    Advantages of Studying at the University of Limerick

    • Blended Learning approach to support student learning
    • Variety of assessment strategies to suit adult learners
    • Excellent library facilities
    • Dedicated student supports (Writing Centre, Student Advisory System, Blended Learning)
    62200| Queen Mary University of London| Dclindent Oral Surgery|

    If you’re a qualified dentist who wishes to pursue a career in Oral Surgery, this Programme is for you. The Professional Doctorate in Oral Surgery provides you with an integrated three-year training programme, so you can gain high-level research expertise alongside your clinical training.

    • Combines academic study, research and clinical training to give you a completely rounded training
    • Be taught by our distinguished international experts and have regular contact with them throughout the programme
    • Strong emphasis on close chair-side support throughout the programme
    • Study at one of UK’s top-rated dental schools and one of top 11 in the World. We’re joint first for research impact according to last REF (2014)

    What you'll study

    This new programme is for qualified dentists who wish to further their knowledge and clinical skills in the field of Oral Surgery. Oral surgery is defined by the UK General Dental Council as ‘The treatment and ongoing management of irregularities and pathology of the jaw and mouth that require surgical intervention.’

    Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of the subject and will develop their diagnostic and surgical skills in this dental specialism. This degree integrates clinical competency progression with doctoral level research. Clinical training is based on the competencies described in the Specialty Training Curriculum for Oral Surgery, Royal College of Surgeons of England. Details of the latter can be found on this link: https://www.gdc-uk.org/docs/default-source/specialist-lists/oral-surgery-curriculum-february-2014.pdf?sfvrsn=fe3f4ccc_2

    Students will receive clinical training, formal teaching and undertake doctoral level research. Teaching and training is provided by experienced clinical and academic staff who have a proven track record in training specialty registrars in Oral Surgery. Students will carry out treatment on patients under local anaesthetic, with and without sedation and will also attend general anaesthetic operating theatres. The diverse patient population of East London provide ample opportunities for acquiring clinical knowledge and surgical skills.

    You’ll take a programme of seminars, lectures and tutorials, starting with an introductory course on the fundamentals of oral surgery and its related disciplines before going on to review the clinical and scientific basis of the subject and its evidence base.

    You’ll then enter supervised clinical practice, conducting treatment planning and clinical procedures, including a number of complex surgical treatments.

    You’ll also complete a research project, where you’ll demonstrate the application of scientific method to a problem related to Oral Surgery. This project will then form the basis of your dissertation. Throughout the duration of the programme, you’ll gain advanced research skills to professional doctorate level and develop sophisticated critical appraisal skills in relation to published literature.

    In addition to your studies, you’ll also have a chance to interact with other specialists, through an extensive seminar series held within the Institute of Dentistry, the Blizard Institute and Queen Mary as a whole.

    The DClinDent Degree meets level 8 of the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ).

     

    Structure

    • Three compulsory knowledge and clinical skills modules
    • Three compulsory research modules, including your final dissertation (up to 50,000 words)

    Assessment

    • Each module is assessed separately, including essays, written, clinical and viva voce examinations
    • You will also be assessed on case presentations and clinical, diagnostic and treatment planning
    • You will be assessed through your dissertation and research projects

    Dissertation

    The dissertation forms a major component of your degree. You’ll write a final report of up to 50,000 words on your research project.

     Teaching

    You'll be taught through a combination of expert seminars, supervised clinical sessions, one-to-one tutorials, self-directed learning, case presentations and reading. You'll also be taught relevant laboratory methodology.

    Your individual study time could be spent preparing for, or following up on, formal study sessions, reading, producing written work, completing projects and revising for examinations.

    The direction of your individual study will be guided by the formal study sessions you attend, along with your reading lists and assignments.

    You will be assigned an Academic Adviser who will guide you in both academic and pastoral matters throughout your time at Queen Mary.

    This professional doctorate programme includes weekly teaching and clinical contact hours in addition to numerous hours of independent learning and research. Please contact the course convenor for information on the number of contact hours per week for this programme.

    Where you'll learn

    Facilities

    New postgraduate study and research facilities are available in the state of the art Blizard building, as well as the Institute of Dentistry.

    The Institute of Dentistry facilities include:

    • 11 dedicated seminar rooms and a student learning centre
    • 92 production laboratory spaces
    • Digital imaging and two cutting-edge cone beam CT machines
    • A PC in every operatory with ‘slave screen’ on chair for viewing images and discussing results with patient
    • Modern facial-scanning equipment
    • Facilities and services for 72 ‘phantom’ heads

    Campus

    Your postgraduate learning experience is enhanced by our fantastic location in Whitechapel, in east London.

    Not only are we in one of the capital’s most vibrant areas to live and work but we also serve a diverse local community, with 92 different languages spoken by the borough’s 300,000 residents. You will develop your clinical skills and knowledge while caring for this community. Moreover, the Institute offers you many exciting opportunities to develop an understanding of health and the treatment of disease in a global and international context.

    62175| University of East London| Educational and Child Psychology Prof Doc|

    This course provides full-time professional training leading towards registration with the Health and Caring Professions Council (HCPC) as an Educational Psychologist (this is a protected title). During the programme trainees will participate in university based teaching and learning, modular assessments, research culminating in a doctoral thesis and professional practice placements in Local Authorities and other settings relevant to educational psychologist work.

    This course will equip you to work as an Educational Psychologist in Local Authority children’s services, Educational Psychology teams, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), voluntary agencies or independently. We are driven by our determination to work towards social justice for vulnerable young people and their families and for children with special educational needs, and to advocate for their rightful place in society.

    The Professional Doctorate in Educational and Child Psychology programme at UEL aims:

    To ensure trainees:

    • develop the Standards of Proficiency required to work as safe and effective educational psychologists  
    • understand the implications of the HCPC’s standards of conduct, performance and ethics
    • develop autonomous practice and reflective thinking
    • develop appropriate research skills as a basis for evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence
    • respect the rights and needs of service users through a commitment to equal opportunities and the principles of beneficence, autonomy and social justice.
    • become competent and creative educational psychologists able to work effectively in educational and community settings

    WHAT YOU'LL LEARN

    The course involves campus-based learning and teaching, self-directed learning, research and placement in Educational Psychology Services (EPS) and other employment settings, where you will work under supervision.

    In your first year you will spend most of the first two terms on campus, completing modules in Professional Practice, Child Development, the Process of Psychological Assessment and Consultation and Intervention.

    While studying these modules you will also spend time developing skills with children and young people.

    In the third term you will undertake a module in Professional Practice in the Real World, during which you will have a block placement in an EPS setting. The sixth module is Research Design, which prepares you for your research thesis.

    In your second year you will take on a bursary-supported placement for three days of the week. During the autumn term you will complete a module at the university on research – in order to complete your research proposal on the placement.

    Throughout the year you will also take a module in Developing the Competent and Reflective Practitioner in Simple Systems and you will begin the research for your thesis.

    In the third year you will continue in your placement, as well as completing a module in Developing the Critical and Reflective practitioner in Complex Systems. You will complete your research and write up your thesis.

    YOUR FUTURE CAREER

    There is a national shortage of educational psychologists and graduates of our programme are in great demand. 

    Our programme is designed to give you the opportunity to:

    • Qualify as a practitioner educational psychologist with the HCPC
    • Become a creative applied psychological practitioner
    • Apply psychology to make a positive different to children, families, carers and schools
    • Apply best educational psychology practice, based on research evidence and professional experience (practice based evidence) 
    • Become a self-reflective practitioner and continue to develop personally and professionally through your career

    We are focused on community involvement and we train people to work for local authorities. Some will go on to work privately but the vast majority will end up being public servants. We want to train educational psychologists who can work effectively across diverse communities. We therefore actively seek applications from underrepresented groups.

    What every one of our graduates will take with them is a sense of our values – an awareness and understanding of diversity, a commitment to social justice, beneficence and promoting autonomy.

    Please note a trainee place is an exempted occupation for the purpose of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. All "spent" and "unspent" convictions must be declared. Having a "spent" or "unspent" conviction may impede your application for the course. This will depend on the circumstance and background to your offence in relation to the university place that you are applying for. Evaluation of information is based on strict confidentiality and discretion.

    62132| Queen Mary University of London| DClinDent Endodontics|

    If you’re a qualified dentist who wishes to pursue a career in Endodontics at specialist level, then this Programme is for you. The Professional Doctorate in Endodontics is an integrated three-year full-time training programme so you can gain high-level research expertise alongside your clinical training.

    • Combines academic study, research and clinical training to give you a completely rounded training
    • Taught by our distinguished international experts and have regular contact with them throughout the programme
    • Strong emphasis on close chair-side support throughout the programme
    • Study at one of UK’s top-rated dental schools and one of top 11 in the World (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2020). We’re joint first for research impact according to last REF (2014)

    What you'll study

    This new Professional Doctorate programme is for qualified dentists who wish to further their knowledge and clinical skills in the field of Endodontics to specialist level. Endodontics is defined by the General Dental Council (UK) as ‘The cause, prevention and treatment of diseases and injuries of the tooth root, dental pulp, and surrounding tissue.’

    Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of the subject and will develop their skills in this dental specialty. This degree integrates clinical competency progression with doctoral level research. The contents of the modules will reflect the Curriculum for Specialist Training in Endodontics of the General Dental Council (UK).

    Students will receive clinical training, formal teaching and undertake doctoral level research. Teaching and training is provided by experienced clinical and academic staff. The diverse patient population of east London provides ample opportunities for acquiring clinical knowledge and surgical skills.

    You’ll participate in a programme of seminars, lectures and tutorials, starting with an introductory course on the fundamentals of endodontics before going on to review the clinical and scientific basis of the subject and its evidence base.

    You’ll then enter supervised clinical, and as appropriate laboratory-based, training; conduct treatment planning and clinical procedures, including for complex cases.

    You’ll also complete a research project, where you’ll demonstrate the application of scientific method to a problem related to endodontics. This project will then form the basis of your dissertation. Throughout the duration of the programme, you’ll gain advanced research skills to professional doctorate level and develop critical appraisal skills in relation to the published literature.

    In addition to your studies, you’ll also have a chance to interact with other specialists, through an extensive seminar series held within the Institute of Dentistry, the Blizard Institute and other Queen Mary institutions.

    The DClinDent Degree meets level 8 of the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) UK.

    Structure

    • Three compulsory knowledge and clinical skills modules
    • Three compulsory research modules, including your final dissertation (up to 50,000 words)

    Assessment

    • Each module is assessed separately, including essays, written, clinical and viva voce examinations
    • You will also be assessed on case presentations and clinical, diagnostic and treatment planning
    • You will be assessed through your dissertation and research projects

    Dissertation

    The dissertation forms a major component of your degree. You’ll write a final report of up to 50,000 words on your research project.

    Teaching

    You'll be taught through a combination of expert seminars, supervised clinical sessions, one-to-one tutorials, self-directed learning, case presentations and reading. You'll also be taught relevant laboratory methodology.

    Your individual study time could be spent preparing for, or following up on, formal study sessions, reading, producing written work, completing projects and revising for examinations.

    The direction of your individual study will be guided by the formal study sessions you attend, along with your reading lists and assignments.

    You will be assigned an Academic Adviser who will guide you in both academic and pastoral matters throughout your time at Queen Mary.

    This professional doctorate programme includes weekly teaching and clinical contact hours in addition to numerous hours of independent learning and research. Please contact the course convenor for information on the number of contact hours per week for this programme.

    Where you'll learn

    Facilities

    New postgraduate study and research facilities are available in the state of the art Blizard building, as well as the Institute of Dentistry.

    The Institute of Dentistry facilities include:

    • 11 dedicated seminar rooms and a student learning centre
    • 92 production laboratory spaces
    • Digital imaging and two cutting-edge cone beam CT machines
    • A PC in every operatory with ‘slave screen’ on chair for viewing images and discussing results with patient
    • Modern facial-scanning equipment
    • Facilities and services for 72 ‘phantom’ heads

    Watch our video to see more of our facilities.

    Moreover, our clinical facilities are complemented by Outreach Clinics including Barkantine, Sir Ludwig Guttman and Southend.

    Campus

    Your postgraduate learning experience is enhanced by our fantastic location in Whitechapel, in east London.

    Not only are we in one of the capital’s most vibrant areas to live and work but we also serve a diverse local community, with 92 different languages spoken by the borough’s 300,000 residents. You will develop your clinical skills and knowledge while caring for this community. Moreover, the Institute offers you many exciting opportunities to develop an understanding of health and the treatment of disease in a global and international context.

    About the Institute

    If you study with us, you will join a dynamic, successful school with a first-class reputation: the Institute is ranked 11th in the World for dentistry in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2020, and joint first for our research impact (REF 2014).

    The Institute of Dentistry is a special place to undertake your postgraduate studies. We bring together a number of world-leading researchers in basic and clinical sciences who supervise research students in the fields of oral medicine, oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral epidemiology, oncology, dental biomaterials, dental biophysics, dental public health, dental education, periodontology, orthodontics, paediatric, prosthetic and conservative dentistry.

    The Institute is part of Queen Mary’s Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Queen Mary is part of the University of London and a member of the Russell Group.

    62092| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Education (EdD)|

    The programme has been specifically designed for professionals - practitioners, policy-makers, leaders and managers, academics and teachers - at all levels of education, from early childhood through further and higher education, to lifelong learning.

    The Doctorate in Education is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend the university for taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a thesis.

    The programme has been specifically designed for professionals - practitioners, policy-makers, leaders and managers, academics and teachers - at all levels of education, from early childhood through further and higher education, to lifelong learning.

     Specifically the EdD aims to:

    • Promote an understanding of research evidence and methodologies relevant to professional practitioners
    • Develop a critical awareness of the policy context in which professional practice takes place
    • Enable participants to undertake a research study of relevance to their professional activities.

    "Blow the dust off your brain, practice your theories and theorise your practices with this challenging, stimulating and thought provoking programme." Visit the testimonials tab to read more.

    The EdD has one entry point a year, in October.  

    The programme consists of five units with five associated formative assignments taught in mainly two-day Course Session events to support the development of your research plan and proposal (years 1 and 2), Regular e-supported learning between Course Sessions and a Research thesis (up to 60,000 words) in years 3 and 4.

    Course Content and Assessment

    The programme is assessed by four formative assignments, one summative assignment and a Research Thesis. These are attached to the following units:

    Module 1 EDU-40116: Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher 

    Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

    Module 2 EDU-40104: Critical theories and analytical perspectives in education 

    Assignment: Theoretical Perspectives on education policy and practice

    Module 3 EDU-40117: Research methods and evaluation 

    Assignment: A General Research Methods critique

    Module 4 EDU-40105: The pilot study     

    Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

    Module 5 EDU-50001: Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal 

    This is a summative assignment (5,000 words written and 1,000 words oral presentation)

    Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis 

    This will be between up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

    Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis.

    Alternative exit point for the EdD

    Upon successful completion of the taught part of the EdD programme and a 15-20,000 word mini-thesis, students may be awarded an MRes (Education).

    62090| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Social Work (DSW)|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62089| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Physiotherapy (DHealthSci (physiotherapy)) or (DHealthSci (Physio))|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62088| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Health Sciences (DHealthSci)|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62087| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Nursing (DNursing)|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62086| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Counselling (DCouns)|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62085| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Public Health (DPH)|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62084| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Health Education (DEdHealth)|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62083| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Pharmacy (DPharm)|

    Professional doctorate programmes are increasingly the choice of professionals.

    They have similar demands to that of a PhD but are structured slightly differently. Divided into two stages, with the first stage devoted to professionally focused teaching with assessments. The second stage focuses on research with students managing a research project usually based on their professional practice.

    The programmes are designed to support experienced professionals, enabling committed professionals to study flexibly to achieve a doctorate.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    1. Evaluate and reflect on the core skills that are required for effective communication at an interpersonal and organizational level.
    2. Critically assimilate the current political challenges in health and social care and the role that culture, power and politics plays when communicating with organizations in this context.
    3. Critically analyse and appraise the key elements of productive team working, including effective management of workforce conflicts, and how these can inform planned change processes.
    4. Identify and apply strategies for implementing a change process and for networking across boundaries to build relationships and share information, plans and resources.
    5. Critically reflect on the key characteristics and skills of an effective leader and how these can be used to implement change in the workplace.
    6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of research and evaluation.
    7. Critically evaluate the research evidence base to inform the development of practice based/professional research questions.
    8. Develop an appreciation and knowledge base of quantitative and qualitative paradigms, methodologies and methods and their application to practice based/professional research
    9. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a range of research methodologies and methods.
    10. Analyse and reflect on the knowledge of the research process and methodologies and how these relate to own proposed research, providing a rationale and justification for choices made.
    11. Compose and critically debate a justified rationale for the research philosophy underpinning the project.
    12. Discriminate between and justify different research methodologies and methods underpinning the research project.
    13. Select and critically discuss the relevant data analysis methods for the proposed project.
    14. Develop a research proposal for the pilot study that demonstrates the ability to critically and analytically conceptualize the design of the research project.
    15. Critically analyse and examine the principles of research ethics and governance.
    16. Conduct a pilot study that shows the ability to implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of individual disciplines.
    17. Develop or select appropriate research tools that will collect data to meet the aims and objectives of the research questions/hypotheses.
    18. Demonstrate the intellectual capacity to undertake independent and original doctoral level research.
    19. Synthesise the relevant literature in order to develop the research question(s) or hypothesis.
    20. Design and justify an appropriate framework for the proposed research project that effectively integrates empirical focus, context, theory and methodology.
    21. Confidently and concisely communicates an appropriate ethical strategy for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses.
    22. Communicate ideas and arguments effectively orally and in writing in language that is appropriate to doctoral level study.
    23. Provide a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate achievement of competencies required for advanced practice as described in the competency frameworks relative to your professional practice. 
    24. Demonstrate that you have developed a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of a chosen field of your professional practice, through research, enquiry and critical reflection, and created an interpreted new knowledge, principally through the production of a thesis, which is of suitable standard to satisfy the University Criteria on Doctoral work.

    COURSE CONTENT:

    Part 1-Years 1 and 2

    Part 1 is the taught element where you will achieve the key learning outcomes/competencies required for your specific route on the Health Professional Doctorate programme, in relation to your area of professional background and your specific research project proposal. Part 1 will conclude with a thesis proposal that will inform your doctoral research for Part 2 (Years 3 onwards) of the programme.

    During Part 1, you will study using a variety of learning media and tools, mainly through distance learning at the University, in your home or work place. These will include face-to-face seminar(s) at the beginning of Part 1 as your induction onto the programme, and at various times during the 2-year period of Part 1 to participate in workshops, share progress with other students and staff through group work and presentations, and for formative assessment. There will also be distance learning modules (electronic and paper based) produced by the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    These modules have been carefully designed to incorporate activities that will develop your understanding of particular issues and concepts, application of knowledge to practice, and help you to reflect on your current practice.

    Part 2 (Years 3 onwards)

    Once you have successfully completed Part 1 you will undertake your research in Part 2 to produce your doctoral thesis for the professional doctorate, which will ensure you will be eligible for future potential NHIR funding for clinical lectureship and senior clinical lectureship awards. However this does depend on your research approach and route taken on the professional doctorate. You will have a supervisor who will have been assigned at the start of year 2 of Part 1 who will now be your main point of contact to take your research project forward to completion. As well as receiving personal support from your supervisor there may also be occasional workshops available at Keele to support your progress and group meetings to maintain contact with your fellow student to continue the peer support developed in Part 1 of the programme.

    APPLICATION PROCESS:

    Our next intake is in October 2020 but we welcome applications all year around.

    Visit our website for more information on the application process and why Keele is the institution to continue your professional development - https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/postgraduateresearch/

    62082| Keele University| Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (DCRIM)|

    The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. 

    In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a 60,000 word thesis.

    The DCrim builds on the established and very successful UG and PGT provision in Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School to provide a specialist route for professionals and managers working in the field of criminal justice, or in related fields, who wish to embark on doctoral study located within their own professional discipline and practice.

    Indeed, this programme focuses on practitioners and professionals in criminal justice (e.g. policing, courts, probation, prison work, alternative sanctions, community sanctions, service providers in the sphere of drugs and addiction, and so on) or related fields of work and practice (e.g. local authority and third sector service providers in the sphere of crime prevention, security, community building and offender rehabilitation; private providers in the above or related spheres; non-governmental action in a variety of spheres such as environmental action, human rights policy and activism, and so on). This list is not exhaustive.

    Practitioners and professionals working in fields and organisations as diverse as (e.g.) Amnesty International and (e.g.) the Police all share a common sphere of work which is structured around problems and issues of deviance from legal norms.

    COURSE CONTENT

    Module 1 (30 credits) Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher (EDU-40116)

    Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

    Module 2 (30 credits) Critical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice (CRI-40034)

    Assignment: Theoretical perspectives essay

    Module 3 (30 credits) Research methods and evaluation (EDU-40117)

    Assignment: A general research methods critique

    Module 4 (30 credits) The pilot study (EDU-40105)     

    Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

    Module 5 (60 credits) Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal (EDU-50001)

    This is a summative assignment comprising a written research proposal and an oral presentation

    Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis 

    This will be up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

    Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis.

    62034| Liverpool John Moores University| Professional Doctorate in Applied Sport and Exercise Science|

    LJMU's Professional Doctorate in Applied Sport and Exercise Science enables you to create and interpret new knowledge associated with your own professional practice.

    • Designed to support the creation and interpretation of new professional practice in your own area
    • Enjoy high quality supervision on this programme which is underpinned by high-grade research
    • Go on to work with elite athletes or take up a position in physical activity promotion, education, teaching or research
    • Work closely with academic staff who are leaders in their research field and experts in training

    Applied Sport and Exercise Science is an established discipline with growing possibilities for qualified professionals.

    Opportunities for professional training at doctoral level are increasingly important for vocational careers within sport and exercise. This doctorate facilitates the creation and interpretation of new professional knowledge.

    To obtain the award you will need to complete a related Masters programme or MPhil and spend two or more years acquiring a range of supervised skills connected with applied research.

    The programme is underpinned by a strong focus on equipping future Applied Sport and Exercise Scientists for a range of professional scenarios associated with problem solving.

    You will develop your skills as a research practitioner, more specifically the ability to complete research projects in the real world. You will also demonstrate that you have the generic professional skills required to be an Applied Sport and Exercise Scientist through your own work-based learning experiences, taught sessions on the programme and extensive supervision.

    Course modules

    Your programme is made up of a number of a number of core modules as detailed below.

    • Professional Planning and Training in Sport and Exercise Sciences (30 credits)
    • Sport and Exercise Science Professional Practice (270 credits)
    • Reflection in Sport and Exercise Science (60 credits)

    Study hours

    You will be required to attend the University for five days of staff-supported learning in the first five months of the course (January to May). A development day following this initial period will be held approximately every eight weeks. The remaining delivery will largely be focused upon individually negotiated contact sessions with your supervisor.

    Teaching methods

    The programme is designed around individual professional requirements to ensure all students receive the tailored, specific support that best facilitates their own professional development.

    Applied learning

    Staff have extensive networks with numerous elite and professional sporting and exercise organisations providing our students with research and placement opportunities. We have contacts in: professional UK and European football, cricket and rugby teams; Olympic sports and UK institutes of sport; local councils; hospitals and clinics.

    Assessment

    To cater for the wide-ranging content of our courses and the varied learning preferences of our students, we offer a range of assessment methods on each programme. Assessment techniques vary from module to module to reflect relevant assessment approaches and the key learning points of each topic.

    Assessment on this course includes: a professional training audit, a systematic review, scientific and professional reports, reflections and a viva voce exam at the end of the programme.

    Employability

    LJMU has an excellent employability record with 96% (HESA 2017) of our postgraduates in work or further study six months after graduation. Our applied learning techniques and strong industry connections ensure our students are fully prepared for the workplace on graduation and understand how to apply their knowledge in a real world context.

    Employment opportunities in Applied Sport and Exercise Science have become increasingly professionalised in recent years. As a consequence there is a need for individuals to demonstrate high level professional and personal skills. A growing number of Applied Sport and Exercise Science graduates work in applied settings as practitioners and promoters, as well as taking employment in Applied Sport and Exercise Science education, teaching and research positions.

    Staff on the course have existing experience of supervised trainees working in the Applied Sport and Exercise Science service domain.

    61714| Dublin City University| Professional Doctorate in Elite Performance (Sport)|

    Introduction

    The Professional Doctorate in Elite Performance (Sport) (Level 10 NFQ, 240 ECTS) is a four year part-time, blended learning programme, comprising both research and taught elements. The programme, delivered by the DCU School of Health and Human Performance, will exploit the working context of students by supporting them to develop evidence-based solutions to their ‘real world’ workplace problems from across the sporting landscape. 

    Aimed at the next generation of practice leaders in sport, the qualification is designed to enhance and acknowledge the quality of innovation, critical review and systematic application of appropriate theories and research to sport performance. The part-time nature of the course enables students to embed their learning and research within their own professional practice and ensure that the acquired knowledge and understanding gained through the research journey then be integrated directly into the organisations and systems in which they work.

    Course Overview

    The programme comprises of both research and taught elements. Modules 1 - 4 comprise modules (60 ECTS) that critically reflect on theories and practice of sport performance, develop an advance understanding of research methodologies and skills, and provide students an opportunity to relate this knowledge and understanding to their own applied and professional context. Module 5, the DProfElite (Sport) Thesis (180 ECTS), involves the completion of a research project and thesis. 

    The taught elements of the programme will be delivered using a blended learning strategy, with delivery being undertaken using a combination of online and face-to-face. Supporting the blended learning approach, two ‘on-campus’ learning blocks will be a feature of the students’ learning journey and will offer opportunities for assessment, sharing of practice, face-to-face teaching and networking amongst the student cohort.

    Throughout the modules, as is typical of doctoral level study, students will engage in independent study of relevant issues and ideas raised during the module. Participants will be expected to engage in reading and critical review of literature relevant to the module and their own performance area.

    Careers

    Graduates of the Professional Doctorate in Elite Performance (Sport) will have established their authority in their area of doctoral research by making a domain-specific contribution at the forefront of professional practice. Graduates will be prepared to take leadership roles in their domain which will allow them influence the way in which their profession is approached both nationally and internationally. Graduates will gain a formal academic recognition of their professional development and standing that exemplifies the specific contribution made to extending knowledge and professional practice in sport performance.

    61485| Bournemouth University| Doctor of Education Creative and Media|

    We have designed this part-time course to support teachers, lecturers, media professionals, trainers and other educational professionals working in creative/ media/ technology related areas, to conduct doctoral research into their own professional practice in education.

    The course is split into two phases. In the taught phase, you’ll be trained in a cohort on the conceptual frameworks for educational research, methodology, ethics, literature reviewing and data collection. In the supervised, stage, you'll be supported in conducting your project to completion and publication. This course will help you become a doctoral researcher and improve your professional practice to impact on teaching and learning. You will be supported by the course team, fellow students, members of the Centre for Education, Media and Practice and our active group of Visiting Fellows and Professors, a rich and dynamic community of practice.

    In addition to the entry requirements, you will need to be an educational professional with an appetite for enquiry, a passion for reflective thinking about your practice and a desire to take on the challenge of doctoral level study in your discipline context. At the application stage, you will need a viable proposal in the form of a short expression of interest, explaining your role and your prospective research project. You will also need the time to focus on this research, on average one day a week, or equivalent hours spread over the week for four to six years. 

    61328| Aston University| Optometry / Ophthalmic Science - Professional Doctorate|

    Course outline

    Our flexible Optometry / Ophthalmic Science Professional Doctorate has been designed for those working in full-time professional practice who want to develop their expertise and gain specialist knowledge while continuing to work. This unique professional doctorate programme will enable you to enhance your knowledge, and critical awareness of current issues to be at the forefront of the academic discipline.

    Delivered online through our innovative framework of flexible credit accumulation, you’ll be able to select modules suited to your passions and career development goals, as well as getting the opportunity to further explore a topic of your choice with a substantial piece of research.

    Course structure

    The qualification you will be awarded with depends on your profession and if you are a practicing optometrist or not:

    The Doctor of Optometry programme is aimed at practising optometrists, who will complete case records where required for taught module coursework and will undertake a practice-based research project.

    The Doctor of Ophthalmic Science programme is for eye care professionals who may not be practising optometrists, e.g. medics/ orthoptists/ product designers; these students may complete scientific essays to fulfil the coursework requirements and undertakea non-clinical research project.

    Both qualifications are broken down into two elements; taught and research.

    As a new student, you will initially register as postgraduate student within our framework of flexible credit accumulation (FCA). Within this framework it is possible to graduate with a:

    • Postgraduate Certificate in Optometry (60 taught credits)
    • Postgraduate Diploma in Optometry (120 taught credits)
    • MSc Optometry/ Ophthalmic Science (180 credits: 120 taught, 60 dissertation)
    • Doctor of Optometry (DOptom)/ Doctor of Ophthalmic Science (DOphSc).

    Up to 60 credits may be awarded in respect of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL), whether experiential or certificated (e.g. previous completion of the Aston MOptom).

    To progress to full doctoral registration requires a minimum of 120 taught module credits including the compulsory 20 credit Research Methods module, an approved project proposal, and successful completion of the qualifying report stage, assessed byviva voceexamination with an internal examiner. The report and the viva voce examination will be used to assess suitability for progression to the full doctoral project.

    Candidates may only progress to the ophthalmic doctorate if they achieve 60% in the taught element of the programme and at least 60% in their dissertation that is submitted following completion of the taught element.

    Modules

    Worth 20 credits each, which is nominally equivalent to 200 hours of student learning,our modules consist of remote access lectures with electronic formative assessments and a module coursework assignment such as reflective case records, or an essay/literature review related to the module.

    There are two study periods per year to complete taught modules; 1st October -31st January and 1st March -30th June, please note dates are given as an approximate and are subject to change. Module results are ratified at Examination Boards held shortly after the end of each study period.

    Taught modules include:

    • Accommodation and Presbyopia
    • Advanced Contact Lenses
    • General Ocular Therapeutics
    • Geriatric Optometry
    • Glaucoma
    • Investigative Ophthalmic Science
    • Myopia
    • Nutrition and the Eye
    • Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics (General Optical Council approved Independent Prescribing module)
    • Prescribing for disorders of the eye (General Optical Council approved Independent Prescribing module)
    • Refractive Surgery
    • Retinal and Macular Disorders
    • Research Review.

    As part of the flexible programme as a UK optometrist, you may complete the theoretical element of the General Optical Council approved Independent Prescribing for Optometrists module.

    Module list provides an overview of what is currently available, this list is subject to change. The above modules are also available for completion as standalone professional development courses, see the website for more information.

    Thesis

    Your thesis will form the major component of your doctorate. Supervised by members of the Aston Optometry School, you will develop your research proposal based on your own clinical interests, or, you may opt to select a project nominated by an Aston academic. As this is a distance-learning programme, the research is not normally carried out on the University campus, and it is essential that the you have access to the facilities and resources needed to carry out your research, usually in your place of work.

    This stage requires a significant long-term commitment, as it is equivalent to around 2 years of full-time work (i.e. 4 years part-time). Candidates ultimately submit a thesis which is examined in a viva voce examination.

    Learning, teaching and assessment

    As a part-time distance learning student, your lectures will be delivered online using Blackboard, our virtual learning environment. The lectures, which are available whenever you chose to view them to ensure maximum flexibility, are accompanied by short formative tests throughout the module. Each module includes a substantial piece of coursework, e.g. a scientific literature review or portfolio of case records.

    The programme will be assessed through a combination of written and oral examinations, class tests, individual and group coursework, projects, presentations and practical assessments.

    For the main element of the doctorate, the research project, candidates submit a report and undergo a qualifying report stage within one year of becoming research active. Once this stage has been passed, candidates continue their research, culminating in the submission of a thesis (up to 80, 000 words). Your thesis is assessed in a viva examination by experts in the chosen field. The degree of Doctor of Optometry or Doctor of Ophthalmic Science is awarded to candidates who successfully defend their thesis.

    61324| Staffordshire University| Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology|

    Our Professional Doctorate offers a unique opportunity to experience and develop your professional skills in Health Psychology, under the guidance of highly qualified and committed staff.

    Health psychology is the study of psychological processes and their application to health, illness and healthcare. Through this course, you’ll develop competence in professional skills, as well as research, psychological interventions, teaching, and consultancy.

    The qualification will provide a guarantee for employers that you’re competent in core aspects of health psychology and professional practice.

    This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society. When you’re awarded the degree you’ll gain Stage 2 accreditation towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist and be eligible to apply to register as a Health Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

    Staffordshire University has a thriving Health Psychology research culture, focused in the Staffordshire Centre for Psychological Research, with an excellent national and international reputation.

    The Health Psychology Programmes at Staffordshire University have nine commendations from the BPS (2018).

    Please note the closing date for the Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology is 30 June 2020.

    Interviews will be held on 30 July 2020.

    Please note that this course requires full time students to be on placement for a minimum of two years and to pay the fees detailed per year of study. Students need to allow for an additional period of time for writing up during which there is a writing up fee to be paid each year until completion.

    On successful completion of study, we will issue the following award: Professional Doctorate Health Psychology

    Work placements

    You’re expected to have a relevant health-related placement (paid or unpaid) before applying to the course. The placement will need to be formally approved prior to you joining us, and you’ll need to identify a workplace contact (who will be a suitably qualified healthcare professional) who will be available to support you. Placements differ across trainees, if you’re concerned whether your placement is suitable, then please contact the course leaders directly.

    You’ll be assigned a University supervisor who will visit you and your contact at the beginning, middle and (usually) end of the placement.

    Sometimes you may also need to spend time in other settings to attain all the experience and skills you need to complete the course.

    Course content

    The taught elements of the course involve a programme of interactive workshops which runs throughout the year, covering five competencies.

    Professional body accreditation

    Postgraduate accreditation

    Approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for the purpose of providing eligibility to apply for registration with the HCPC as a practitioner psychologist.

    The course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as providing Stage 2 training in Health Psychology.

    We have been commended by the British Psychological Society for the positive and strong ethos of developing reflective practice of trainees, the exemplary support we provide which helps foster positive and professional relationships with trainees, and the well-developed and positive relationship with service users who are involved in the development of the programme and trainee’s skills.

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