Professional Doctorate in MSc - Biodiversity Management


    About This Professional Doctorate

    Course Description

    Our MSc by Research and PhD programmes in Biodiversity Management encourage you to undertake original, high-quality research, which culminates in the submission of a thesis. We welcome students with the appropriate background for research.

    During postgraduate research (PGR) studies students research and write a thesis of under the supervision of an academic team. The length of the thesis varies according to the mode of registrations (i.e. no more than 100,000 words for a PhD, or no more than 40,000 words for an MSc by research). Students participate in the vibrant postgraduate community of the School, and have opportunities to attend a number of seminar series organised by the Research Themes and the Research Centres of the School.

    Due to the diversity and international nature of many field-orientated research projects, the amount of time that individual research students spend at the School campus varies. However, students are expected to spend the first months of the PGR study at the School campus to obtain training in research methods and attend a number of research seminars.

    Choosing a topic

    Although sometimes we have specific MSc / MPhil / PhD research projects funded by external research grants in which the research project has already been specified, most of our research students choose their own research topics. Once you have decided on the nature of your project, you should then contact by email the member of staff in the School whose expertise and interests most closely match your area of research and ask them if they will act as your supervisor. It is extremely important that you attach to your email an updated CV, a 2-page research proposal (including background statement, aims and objectives and research methods) and that you indicate how you are planning to fund your PGR studies. You then work with your proposed supervisor on refining your research proposal which provides the starting point for your subsequent research.

    Skills training

    The University’s Graduate School co-ordinates the Research Development Programmefor research students, providing access to a wide range of lectures and workshops on training, personal development planning and career development skills.

    Research within the School is grouped into the following research areas:

    Conservation Biology

    Research within the conservation biology theme is broadly centred on using ecological approaches to understand and maintain biodiversity and ecosystem service provision.

    The main tenet that underpins our work is that it is genuinely applied, with the explicit aim of either improving conservation practice (both in-situ and ex-situ) or informing policy development, both nationally and internationally. To achieve this, we collaborate closely with individuals and organisations including government agencies, not-for-profits, private landowners and corporations from around the world, in addition to more traditional partnerships with academics at other universities and research institutes.

    The scope of work conducted in the conservation biology theme is diverse, spanning multiple levels of biological organisation, from molecular/evolutionary genetics through to ecosystems, and a wide array of taxonomic groups (e.g. mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, butterflies, orchids). Primarily, there are four key accordant areas of expertise. The first is spatial/landscape conservation and ecology, with particular emphasis on protected area network design via systematic conservation planning techniques, as well as the use of novel methods to explore the impacts of environmental change (e.g. habitat fragmentation and degradation, climate warming, urbanisation) on populations and assemblages. The second focuses on analysing extinction risk across a continuum ranging from individual species up to global macroecological patterns. Third, much of the long-standing research in DICE is concentrated on monitoring population dynamics and examining trends in the genetic diversity of threatened species, contributing directly to the success of a whole host of conservation programmes over the years. Finally, we study human-wildlife conflict/interactions (e.g. resource competition, disease transmission, development mitigation, wildlife gardening) from a natural sciences perspective, complementing concurrent social science research or contributing to knowledge within an interdisciplinary framework.

    Geography and Human Ecology

    Our interdisciplinary research theme explores the complexity and diversity of interactions between people, place and environment.

    We pursue our research in a range of geographical and social contexts to elaborate – and engage critically and constructively with – understandings of these relationships and approaches to their management and governance. Our research encompasses questions of sustainability and resilience, set within a broader interest in systems thinking. Research undertaken within our theme is distinguished by significant capacity in the critical and applied social sciences and spatial analysis, and is advanced through strong commitments to theoretical and conceptual innovation, as well as practical research that can influence developments in policy and practice The interdisciplinary basis of the group draws in perspectives from human geography, anthropology, economics, conservation and development studies, and has specific research interests in:

    • Land use change and sustainable landscape planning
    • Applied resource economics and environmental valuation
    • Participatory approaches to natural resource management
    • Ecosystem services and biocultural diversity
    • Political economies of development and tourism

    Members of the theme are active members of the University-wide Kent Interdisciplinary Centre for Spatial Studies (KISS) and the School’s Centre for Biocultural Diversity (CBCD) and Durrell Institute for Conservation and Ecology (DICE). We also host a lively programme of seminar and reading groups that synergise with these wider centre activities. Members of the theme are currently convening a reading group exploring the multiple provocations of the Anthropocene.

    About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

    DICE is Britain’s leading research and postgraduate training centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity, as well as the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people.

    We focus on combining natural and social sciences to understand complex conservation issues and design effective interventions to conserve biodiversity. Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working in collaboration with conservation agencies around the world. This blend of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.


    Visit the MSc - Biodiversity Management page on the University of Kent website for more details!

    (Student Profile)

    Leonie Lawrence

    After finishing my MSc, I joined Global Canopy Programme, initially working on international climate and forest policy before moving on to researching the supply chains driving tropical deforestation. Since then, I have expanded my work in this area, focusing on palm oil and sustainable investment in my previous role at ZSL, and recently joining WCS as Regional Technical Adviser on forest rich commodities. I am currently based in Indonesia working to reduce the impacts of agriculture and its related supply chains, including those of coffee and copra, on protected areas. DICE was invaluable in teaching me about the complexities of conservation, the challenges we face and the range of skills needed for effective interdisciplinary conservation. I loved my time at DICE and now being part of the wide-reaching network of DICE alumni.


    (Scholarship)

    Santander Scholarships - CLOSED - No. of awards TBC

    Santander is offering scholarships of £5,000 each to support students from Iberian and Latin American countries studying for a full-time taught or research Master’s degree at the University of Kent. The Scholarships:
    •are for the forthcoming academic year only (2014-15), the start date cannot be deferred;
    •are for one year only (12 months full-time);
    •may be used at any of the University of Kent’s locations – Canterbury, Medway, Brussels, Paris, or Athens.CriteriaThe awards are not available to students that already have, or are already studying for, a Master’s degree. Candidates must:
    • be a national of one of the 11 countries of the Iberian and Latin American Santander Universities network: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Mexico, Portugal, Peru, Puerto Rico, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela;
    • have graduated or be studying at one of partner universities within the Santander Universities network: Argentina, Brazil , Chile, Columbia, Germany, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Russia, Singapore, Spain, USA, United Kingdom, Uruguay;
    • be resident in one of the countries within the Santander Scheme.
    • have been offered a place to study a full-time Master’s degree at Kent;
    • have achieved a First or a 2:1 or equivalent at undergraduate level.
    • In addition to excellent academic achievement, demonstrate excellence in an area of their life; this may include: ◦extra-curricular activities, such as sports, music, managing events or societies;
    ◦significant achievement gained either in their working life or through volunteering and service to others.

    Value of Scholarship(s)

    5000

    Eligibility

    See scheme details for eligibility critera.

    Application Procedure

    For application details please visit the website

    Further Information

    https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/search/FNADSANTAN02


    (Scholarship)

    Restoring a Kentish icon: feasibility of reintroducing the Chough to Kent - CLOSED - Single Award

    he science of reintroducing species back into the wild has evolved into a distinct branch of conservation science. The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology has been working at the forefront of species conservation and reintroduction biology with partners around the world for over two decades. An opportunity has now arisen to apply this experience and expertise locally, with an analysis of the feasibility of bringing back the iconic Red-billed Chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) to Kent. The Chough population has become highly fragmented with several isolated populations around the coast of Britain. The Chough was once more widespread and formerly occurred as far east as Kent where it became extinct c. 160 years ago. However, it still lives on in the Coat of Arms of Canterbury City and the University of Kent, and potential habitat remains in Kent, with large areas of nature reserves and farmland across the Dover area. This project builds on the experience of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust who led the Chough reintroduction to Jersey through the Birds on the Edge project. The project will also partner with Operation Chough, based at Paradise Park in Cornwall, who have led the ex situ components of the reintroduction programme; and Wildwood Trust in Kent, a leading centre for the conservation and rewilding of British Wildlife.

    Value of Scholarship(s)

    £14,296 (2016/17 rate) plus tuition fees at the Home/EU rate. This scholarship is administered unde

    Eligibility

    Applicants should have at least a 2:1 Honours degree and a good MSc in a relevant subject. Graduates who can demonstrate equivalent relevant experience to MSc level through professional work, research and publications may also be considered.

    Application Procedure

    Applications should comprise of a covering letter (1 page) and CV (2 pages max including the names and contact details of two referees) and should be sent to Dr Bob Smith ([email protected]) by midnight on May 8th 2017.

    Application deadline: midnight on May 8th 2017
    Interview: May 18th 2017
    Start date: 18th September 2017
    Programme: PhD
    Mode of Study: Full time
    Studentship Length: 3 years

    Further Information

    https://www.findaphd.com/search/ProjectDetails.aspx?PJID=85580&LID=695



    Entry Requirements

    For an MSc by research a first degree (at least 2:1) in a relevant subject is required

    All applicants are considered on an individual basis and additional qualifications, professional qualifications and relevant experience may also be taken into account when considering applications.

    Please see our International Student website for entry requirements by country and other relevant information. Due to visa restrictions, students who require a student visa to study cannot study part-time unless undertaking a distance or blended-learning programme with no on-campus provision.

    Please see course website for further details.


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